Jez humble continuous delivery pdf


 

Continuous. Delivery. Jez Humble and David Farley. Upper Saddle River, NJ • Boston Continuous delivery: reliable software releases through build, test, and . Continuous Delivery Jez Humble and David Farley. Pages Startup continuous learning Le. Alan Farley - The Master Swing ruthenpress.info - Higher Intellect. XP and Continuous Integration (Kent Beck). • Continuous Integration Continuous Delivery (Jez Humble & David Farley).

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Jez Humble Continuous Delivery Pdf

Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation (Addison-Wesley Signature Series (Fowler)) [Jez Humble. Continuous Delivery. Jez Humble, ThoughtWorks Studios. @jezhumble # continuousdelivery. DevOpsDays, Hamburg. Page 2. Agile Iteration 0 1 2 3 4. Continuous Delivery by Jez Humble, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

For each, they review key issues, identify best. Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform. With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more. Start Free Trial No credit card required.

While we don't usually do daily deliveries into production, it's now common to see teams doing bi-weekly releases.

Dave and Jez have been part of that sea-change, actively involved in projects that have built a culture of frequent, reliable deliveries. They and our colleagues have taken organizations that struggled to deploy software once a year, into the world of Continuous Delivery, where releasing becomes routine. The foundation for the approach, at least for the development team, is Continuous Integration CI. CI keeps a development team in sync with each other, removing the delays due to integration issues.

Continuous Delivery

A couple of years ago Paul Duvall wrote the book on CI within this series. But CI is just the first step.

Software that's been successfully integrated into a mainline code stream still isn't software that's out in production doing its job. Dave and Jez's book pick up the story from CI to deal with that 'last mile', describing how to build the deployment pipelines that turn integrated code into production software.

This kind of delivery thinking has long been a forgotten corner of software development, falling into a hole between developers and operations teams.

Continuous Delivery

So it's no surprise that the techniques in this book rest upon bringing these teams together, a harbinger of the nascent but growing "devops" movement. This process also involves testers, as testing is a key element of ensuring error-free releases. May 06, Yevgeniy Brikman rated it liked it I'm a bit torn on this book: on the one hand, it is a very thorough look at a number of important, but often overlooked topics; on the other hand, the book is not a very effective teacher of this important material.

The biggest problem is the lack of real world examples.

Chapters are mostly huge blocks of advice: the advice is good, but not memorable or actionable in the way it is presented. There need to be far more examples of real world systems with both good approaches and bad approaches dis I'm a bit torn on this book: on the one hand, it is a very thorough look at a number of important, but often overlooked topics; on the other hand, the book is not a very effective teacher of this important material.

Continuous Delivery

There need to be far more examples of real world systems with both good approaches and bad approaches discussed and compared in detail. Moreover, the book is very very repetitive.

Perhaps it's from an attempt to make each chapter standalone, but while trying to find the new and interesting info in a new chapter, you have to wade through tons of info you read many times in earlier chapters or even earlier paragraphs. There are many sentences, paragraphs, and even pages that can be skipped because they are obvious or just a rehash of something earlier or both.

In short, this is a VERY important - perhaps even required - read for anyone working on medium and large software projects, but this book desperately needs a tldr companion with lots of examples. Without continuous integration, your software is broken until somebody proves it works, usually during a testing or integration stage.

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