Independent study joelle charbonneau pdf


 

In the series debut The Testing, sixteen-year-old Cia Vale was chosen by the United Commonwealth government as one of the best and brightest graduates of . Joelle Charbonneau is the author of the New York Times and USA Today bestselling Joelle Charbonneau Author (). cover image of Independent Study. Independent Study book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. In the series debut The Testing, sixteen-year-old Cia Vale was.

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Independent Study Joelle Charbonneau Pdf

About the Book. Upon arriving at the University, Cia and Tomas, along with the other students who have successfully completed The Testing, learn that students . Independent Study: The Testing, Book 2 PDF (Adobe DRM) download by Joelle. Independent Study: The Testing, Book 2 · Joelle Charbonneau. HMH Books for. 年7月25日 20 *] pdf Independent Study (Joelle Charbonneau) tpb bookshop Transmission extension ipad czech. YOU SEARCH.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? In the series debut The Testing , sixteen-year-old Cia Vale was chosen by the United Commonwealth government as one of the best and brightest graduates of all the colonies. In Independent Study , Cia is a freshman at the University in Tosu City with her hometown sweetheart, Tomas—and though the government has tried to erase her memory of the brutal horrors of The Testing, Cia remembers. But the future of the Commonwealth depends on her. Read more Read less.

I liked proving that I had learned. That I had worked hard. That I was smart. But now I am not sure what is real or what the consequences of a wrong answer will be. While my classmates are concerned about the test affecting the years ahead, I worry I will not survive the day. Normally, I pull my hair back into a thick dark knot in order to keep it out of my way. Today, I decide to leave it down.

Perhaps the long waves will hide the evidence of months of restless nights. If not, maybe the cold compresses my mother taught me to apply to my eyes will help. A wave of longing crashes over me at the thought of my mother. While contact between University students and their families is not expressly forbidden, neither is it encouraged. Most students I know have not heard a word from their loved ones back home.

I have been fortunate. A Tosu official has been willing to pass along small bits of communication from my parents and four older brothers. They are well. My father and my oldest brother, Zeen, are creating a new fertilizer to help plants grow faster. My second oldest brother, Hamin, is engaged. He and his soon-to-be wife will be married next spring. His decision to marry has prompted our mother to look for wives for Zeen and my twin brothers, Hart and Win.

So far, her efforts have been in vain. Aside from my family, one other person has managed to get news to me. Her teacher has hinted Daileen might be chosen for The Testing this year. She is keeping her fingers crossed that she will join me in Tosu City. I am hoping she will fail.

The Testing 2: Independent Study

I want her to stay in a place where the answers to questions make sense. Where I know she will be safe. A knock at the door makes me jump. Are you ready? Those who arrive late will not be allowed to take the exam.

What that means for the future is unclear, but none of us wants to find out. My fingers search until they find the lump that makes me sigh with relief. Months ago, I discovered the symbol I carved into the device to help lead me to the recorder and the confidences stored inside.

When I finished listening to words I had no recollection of speaking, I cut open the mattress and hid the Communicator inside. That the professors and administrators working to prepare us for our futures want us to succeed? Some of them are standoffish. Others arrogant.

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None of the students or educators is perfect, but who is? Those will have to wait. For now, I need to concentrate on my future. Stacia frowns as I step into the hall. Her dark blond hair is pulled back into a sleek ponytail, making her angular features look sharper than usual.

I love psyching out the competition. My parents taught me to value fair play over all else. Not that she would say anything if she did. At first her silences challenged me to bring her out of her shell, as I used to do for my best friend from Five Lakes. Now, with so many questions on my mind, I am grateful for the quiet company. I wave at a couple of older students as they walk by. As always, they ignore us. After today, the upperclassmen assigned to the same field of study will act as our guides.

My upbringing is too strong not to be polite. His dark hair blows in the late-winter breeze. A University bag is slung carelessly over his shoulder. His gray eyes and dimpled smile are focused squarely on me as he waves and comes bounding down the steps.

When Tomas is with me, I feel smarter. More confident. And terrified that everything I think I know and admire about him is a lie.

Stacia rolls her eyes as Tomas kisses my cheek and entwines his fingers with mine. The test starts in ten minutes. Right, Cia? Yes, I have studied hard for this test, but the whispered words on the Transit Communicator make me doubt I could ever fully prepare for what is to come. Not for the first time, I wish my father were here to talk to me. Almost three decades ago, he attended the University. Growing up, I asked hundreds of questions about his time here.

Rarely did he answer them. Back then, I assumed his silence was to keep my brothers and me from feeling pressure to follow in his footsteps. There is only one way to find out. The three of us climb the steps. When we reach the front door, Tomas stops and asks for a moment alone with me. Stacia sighs, warns me not to be late, and stalks inside.

Being your study partner means I can answer questions no matter how tired I am. Most of our classmates assumed Tomas and I pretended to study in order to be alone. Tomas gives my hand a squeeze. Revitalizing the earth is an important job. One I admire. Only the sunshine that creeps in from the glass panes in the front door lights our way. Tosu City has strict laws governing electricity usage. The more classes, the better, the more intelligent the student.

Everyone has but a few classes. Cia has nine. This schedule has me attending nine. She not only has nine classes, she excels at every single one. Cia passes every single challenge. She remembers ancient governing procedures whose incredibly obscure rules allow her to pass a test that nobody else can.

At the end of that lesson, my teacher mentioned an antiquated law that said any citizen may request a hearing on the Debate Chamber floor. Fails at Failing: Even her failures are spectacular Cia is so good at everything, she knows when failure will equate winning.

Failing is the right way to do things because Cia just so fucking magical and perfect. She is praised for knowing when to fail. Like what the actual FUCK? And I understand. Just like the final task during the Induction, this was an assignment designed for failure. It's one thing to be perfect, it's another thing to be so fucking perfect that even your failures are designed to highlight how fucking awesome you are for fucking figuring every single little itty bitty detail out.

Spare me. Magical Leadership! Cia is so bloody perfect that everyone wants her. Let me explain the University. It is like the fucking Harvard of the future, if Harvard requires both intelligence, physical ability, and skills, and its students are willing to literally murder one another for better grades, you get the drift. Ok, maybe not. I've been told that it is pretty much murder to get a better grade than your peers at Harvard My point is that all the students at the University are tremendously capable, are intellectually brilliant, are completely amazing learners, leader in every way.

How else could they have passed the Testing? But out of all of these awe-inspiring, brilliant students, Cia is single-handedly selected to be the best, the brightest. She is hand-selected by the President of the United Commonwealth to be her intern.

Barnes and Professor Holt, I asked that you be assigned to intern in my office. The President has never had an intern before, and has never had interest in an intern before Insidious Girl Hate: There is no slut shaming, but there is a very strong current of distrust and sly undertones of hate towards the other women in this book. The females in this book, the very brilliant, very capable females, I must mention, are all portrayed as stone-cold, emotionless bitches.

Her close friend, Stacia, is cold. Cia is much the same, but somehow, Stacia's determination is portrayed as BAD whereas we're supposed to sympathize with Cia. Her laugh makes me flinch.

She sees competition in other girls, Cia always see something underlying in a common gesture of courtesy.

A girl is "sharp," even when compared to a friendly, smiling boy. Cia seems to think so much better of the guys than she does her fellow female students. Boys are always described with so much more kindness than other females. His face is thin and narrow. His smile warm and angelic. Boys remind her of her brothers, girls are conniving bitches.

In his fitted black pants, shiny black boots, and deep purple shirt, Ian is more than a little imposing. Until he grins. The sternness disappears, replaced by an exuberance that makes me think of my brother Win. Red lips. The marks of an evil witch that is noted quite pointedly. Even a respected professor is not immune to thecharge.

Her hair is slicked off her face. Her scarlet-painted lips curl into an expression of geniality as she addresses those of us assembled here who are in her charge. Dressed in deep crimson, Professor Holt stands near the fireplace.

Lips that match the color of her jumpsuit are curved into a smile. Other girls are giggly, pampered, spoiled. Why paint the University as the penultimate institute of education if you're going to put in dumb female character to be insidiously noted by Cia? Not even the President of the United Commonwealth, the most powerful woman in the country, is immune to being painted in a bad light.

She is cold, unmaternal, inhuman in her iciness. Her face is long and angular. Not what most would call beautiful. But the almond-shaped brown eyes and strong jaw would draw attention anywhere.

Almost all the United Commonwealth presidents have been female. Less focused on politics or power.

[FREE eBook] Independent Study: The Testing, Book 2 by Joelle Charbonneau

Both carry a shimmer of absolute authority. There are many men whom Cia trusts in this book. The same cannot be said about the women. I completely hate the attitude that there can only be one bright, prevailing female presence in a book.

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View all 42 comments. Sep 12, Kathylill rated it did not like it Shelves: This is not the fantastic sequel to a fantastic book. This is like waking up next to the guy you met the night before and who then seemed sexy and attractive after the alcohol glamour is wearing of, monster headaches cloud your mind and you see that he looks nothing like Brad Pitt, not even remotely.

To become one of those people, I have to prove I can do whatever is necessary to succeed. Himanbi Biseck, a dark-skinned girl, is described having a bright smile, "but something about the narrowing of her eyes reminds me of cat stalking a field mouse". Kit, one of the other Testing candidates, tosses her waist-length hair and smiles, amused and smug.

Why does the author feel the necessity to single Cia out? I don't know. Since when is it socially unacceptable to dress up and put on red lipstick or have waist-long hair? Barnes and his team will win. I refuse to let that happen.

But the only way to stop it is to create a new rebellion. A rebellion free of Dr. For that, I will have to step up and be the leader the University is teaching me to be. There are people like me on your side who know you can make it.

She is really that speshul. Self-doubt and thoughts of suicide - she can overcome it in 5 sentences. Our Cia can overcome fear and terror simply by dreaming to shatter ice walls.

Hopeless situation? There is no hopeless situation for Cia because there is always something her brother, her father or her teacher told her, some reclusive childhood memory she can relate to even in the middle of danger. She just closes her eyes and thinks. She is the child of Vicky the Viking and MacGyver. And if not then there is still the BAG.

I hated that fucking bag. She packs and repacks that bag at least a thousand times. If she goes out of campus for 2 hours she packs several loaves of bread, apples and pears and even a change of clothes. She is that outstanding that the University gives her 9 classes whereas all other students have 5 or six.

She is that extraordinary that even the goddamn President of the United Commonwealth wants her, and only her. I would expect nothing less from her. President Collindar speaks before I can wonder what the reference means. Of all the students who came into the Debate Chamber, you were the only one who recited the request without error and the only female who made the attempt for her team. Taking that kind of risk in public is often more difficult for women than men.

Everybody needs her ergo nobody is save from her. She even persuades Tomas, her boyfriend, with a kiss "I put all my love in the kiss and I know he will do as I ask" to leave her in order to do the dangerous stuff alone, because "she is smaller and faster and will be safer on her own. But Tomas is for the most part not present, we are being told not shown about the resistance, the conspiracies and the political background.

Like-minded students? I disliked this book so much.

View all 17 comments. Jun 29, Aj the Ravenous Reader rated it it was amazing Shelves: As a sequel to the Testing, this book is just as amazing. The tests and challenges laid in this story become even more impossible and extremely dangerous as the main characters go through the tests as official university students because this time, the students have to go through the tests while trying to attend every class in their respective fields.

They may be already admitted as university students but that does not mean they are safe from severe and life changing punishment of failing a tes As a sequel to the Testing, this book is just as amazing. They may be already admitted as university students but that does not mean they are safe from severe and life changing punishment of failing a test. Deeper discoveries and truths get revealed in this book including the whole concept behind the so called university and its role in the society.

Jun 21, Jeff Raymond rated it it was amazing Shelves: A friend was kind enough to send me her advance copy of this book, the sequel to my new favorite dystopian series and perhaps book of , The Testing. There's been a pattern with a lot of the dystopian series titles to fall off in quality significantly in the second book in the series looking at you specifically, Divergent.

Not so with Independent Study. Taking place not long after The Testing , where Cia is now in the University, taking classes, and otherwise trying to keep her head down wh A friend was kind enough to send me her advance copy of this book, the sequel to my new favorite dystopian series and perhaps book of , The Testing.

Taking place not long after The Testing , where Cia is now in the University, taking classes, and otherwise trying to keep her head down while solving the issues in front of her. Of course, as one would expect from a dystopian totalitarian government, they're The good news is that the rebel faction is making inroads in the government, and Cia's the next best hope.

The Testing was great not because it broke a lot of new ground, because it didn't, but because it took the dystopian template created in The Hunger Games and Divergent and perfected it. Is Independent Study as good as The Testing? Probably not, but it's different - it relies less on violence and force and more on the thinking processes in order to ensure survival.

It abandons the mystery of a bunch of kids fighting over one goal to a larger political conspiracy, which is right down my alley anyway. Even with the template being pretty standard boilerplate, it succeeds in throwing a few curveballs.

This is a great, great page turner. That the final book isn't due for close to a year is heartbreaking, and I'm hoping I can get my hands on the third book early as I did the first two, because waiting is going to be very difficult. Add this to your lists, and get ready for it when it's finally out, because you're not going to want to miss out. View 2 comments.

Oct 21, Rachel Maniacup rated it it was amazing Recommended to Rachel by: This is indeed a great continuation of the first book! It may not be as action packed as the first one,and a bit slower,but there were heart-pounding moments especially on the Testing games they went through once again. In this new environment,Cia gained new friends and perhaps,some enemies that she's struggling to decide w This is indeed a great continuation of the first book!

In this new environment,Cia gained new friends and perhaps,some enemies that she's struggling to decide who to trust,and who to fear now that things got more political. The twist at the ending blew me away,and I don't know if I'm gonna get over it..

View all 11 comments. Oct 20, Kassidy rated it liked it Shelves: Not much better than the first one, this book is pretty much what I expected. This series is almost like dystopia brain candy. It's just fun and entertaining, but not much substance. The main character, Cia, is just too perfect, but not in a good way! She never does anything wrong and doesn't have any flaws, this gets kinda annoying, it's unrealistic, and I can't connect to her.

She is an ok character to read about, and it's interesting how she figures out all of the tests, but there's not much m Not much better than the first one, this book is pretty much what I expected. She is an ok character to read about, and it's interesting how she figures out all of the tests, but there's not much more to her. Another thing that bothers me about this book is that it doesn't allow you to ask any questions for yourself.

Cia just asks the questions for you. It's like the author wants to make sure you know what you should be questioning and thinking about. It gets a little aggravating and I feel like I'm being babied in a way.. The plot and world is fairly intriguing, but nothing super unique. There are a few cool twists, but nothing that left me speechless. Don't even get me started on the "romance", if you can even call it that.

That aspect of the book just weirds me out.. This series is good if you love dystopia and want something light, entertaining, and fast. There is not much else to it. I will read the next book because I do find the plot interesting and I want to know what happens. Oct 02, Ellie M rated it it was ok.

I had the same problem with the second book as I had with the first- Cia is the bestest most brightest person in the world. She is surrounded by the most brightest students in the country. And yet she is FAR superior.

If the brightest were ranked a 10 out of She's be a If you're going to writes a book about everyone being smart, you have to make everyone actually smart.

The only time other student's show that they're smart is if they're working against Cia. But it rarely happens because Cia is the only smart person in the whole university of giftedly smart students. I love the world and plot and characters. I found myself skimming large amount of this book when Cia droned on like a science teacher explaining why she knew everything in the world.

I don't need a page long explanation of why the pink poison ivy plant is bad. But I'll most likely be skimming huge chunks and pages when Cia goes into teacher mode. View all 4 comments. A good second book.

Our heroine Cia continues to dazzle all with her smarts and her intuition, which saves her and her teammates time and again. Having passed the Testing Book One , Cia and Will who tried to kill her in book one are assigned to the Government specialty department. Cia is selected to lead a team, after solving her first challenge there. Surprisingly, she chooses some local Tosu City ahead of some classmates from her territory.

Cia is not trusted, and is saddled with the heavie A good second book. Cia is not trusted, and is saddled with the heaviest course-load and an internship with the President of the Commonwealth. She gets caught in the middle of a political battle, and has to use all of her skills and wits to survive.

Not quite as good as the first book, mostly because Cia is too perfect in this one, but I look forward to reading the conclusion. Jan 07, Emily rated it liked it Shelves: I'm giving this three stars because overall, it was a perfectly "fine" second book. It wasn't super terrible like Crossed my go-to example for disappointing second books , but then again it didn't really wow me.

Since almost everyone had their memories wiped at the end of the first book, the author pretty much just uses the same recipe all over again in this one -- some dangerous tests, a whole lot of untrustworthy people and a heroine that can do no wrong like literally, she's unrealistically I'm giving this three stars because overall, it was a perfectly "fine" second book. Since almost everyone had their memories wiped at the end of the first book, the author pretty much just uses the same recipe all over again in this one -- some dangerous tests, a whole lot of untrustworthy people and a heroine that can do no wrong like literally, she's unrealistically amazing at everything.

Unfortunately, readers probably did not have their memories wiped like the characters did, which means for people like me who re-read The Testing recently in order to refresh my memory, Independent Study seemed pretty much exactly the same. For the first half anyway. The second half of the book was your typical middle book of a YA dystopian trilogy. I've read enough of them by now to recognise the formula: First book - introduces the dystopian society, characters, etc.

Second book - expands on the dystopian society and the characters, introduces the rebellion because come on, there's always a rebellion. Third book - rebellion. Unless you're Crossed , in which case the second book is comprised of a bit of walking, some poetry and absolutely nothing else. One day I will eventually stop referencing that book in all of my reviews. So yeah, the second half of Independent Study is basically the "I love Cia" show, because she's so much more amazing than everyone else and everyone knows it, and thus she is solely responsible for saving the entire world.

I'm not even exaggerating. In the synopsis for the third book, it says that "Testing survivor Cia Vale knows that she alone can lead the rebellion against the government. I mean, haven't we moved past the whole "Chosen One" phenomenon in literature by now? Sorry, Harry Potter.

I still love you. Anyway, it's taken me this massive review pretty much to say that Independent Study was okay. It was fine. I finished it and didn't feel like I wanted to kill myself afterwards.

And with some of the books I've read recently I'm looking at you, Slaughterhouse-Five that's definitely saying something! Dec 30, Erica rated it it was amazing Shelves: Joelle Charbonneau has written another enticing read that is filled to the brim with exictement and action and stabbed me in the gut, time and time again.

With everything a good dystopian should be, Joelle Charbonneau has continued to raise the stakes and expand this brilliant world. The questions this book raises are so thought-provoking and powerful, and I love the ease at which they are incorporated into the plot. The stakes are raised in Independent Study to a new high, and I was completely e Joelle Charbonneau has written another enticing read that is filled to the brim with exictement and action and stabbed me in the gut, time and time again.

The stakes are raised in Independent Study to a new high, and I was completely engaged from the get go.

I tore through the pages, never wanting to put it down. As the story moves on, the characters, especially Cia, really come into their own. I enjoyed watching the characters grow as the situations they are presented with require.

Michal remains my favorite character of the series, so seeing him pop up again was nice. The ending killed me. Absolutely killed me. The rapid succession at which this trilogy has come out helps, as the wait is less, and I already am antsy to tear through the pages of Graduation Day. Independent Study built on the foundation that The Testing started and expanded everything that was great. I continue to love everything about this trilogy and am excited to see which direction Joelle Charbonneau takes the story in the last book.

View all 3 comments. Jan 18, Nikita rated it it was amazing. It's just as great as the first book. The challenges required more intellectual prowess than physical which I enjoyed even more. It's plot is fast-paced and the writing is engaging. I can't wait to read the third book. Wat een geweldige serie! Snel door naar het 3, laatste deel.

Apr 02, Melanie rated it it was amazing Shelves: The book leaves off a few months after the events in book one. Cia is now a student at the university in Tosu City.

Everything is suppose to be fine now that Cia is at the university, but Cia still has vague memories about her time in the Testing causing her to question the motives of her friends and the Commonwealth's leaders.

I absolutely loved The Testing and was very excited to start this book. Independent Study certainly lives up to it's expectations. This book has just the right amount of action to keep it's readers engaged. I love how the author made the characters complete the puzzles. The puzzles or challenges keep you engaged, you're always wondering what's next or how can the characters possibly complete them.

A lot of people would compare this book series to The Hunger Games trilogy, but this book series is far from being like The Hunger Games. I love Cia she's a very relatable character. She always tries to do what's right, even if the person she's helping is being a real douchebag. I could easily identify with Cia, like how she wants to do well in school, but not hurt or push down others in the process.

There is a good amount of surprises and twists to keep the reader engaged. While there is romance, it doesn't get in the way of the story. Overall I loved Independent Study and I can't wait to read the last book. Those are often the ones who are most interested in doing what is right, not what is popular. The best leaders never make the same mistakes again.

The only way you can learn is if you understand the mistakes that were made. View 1 comment. Oct 27, Kelly Brigid rated it really liked it Shelves: Not quite as good as the Testing, but still really entertaining. Sep 06, Callie Rose Tyler rated it liked it. I'd say that the first third of the book was great and then there was a noticeable decline until we got toward the end a. Yes, this book felt like mostly filler, wrapping up the previous book and setting up the next one. I guess it's difficult to make going to class and doing your homework interesting, especially when you start the book with an exciting and interesting dangerous game full of explosions and snakes!

The only way to make the day to day more interesting is with world building or character development and I'm not real impressed with either in this series. The world that we see is pretty standard for the dystopian genre as of late, a wealthy capitol city surrounded by less wealthy colonies and even less wealthier colonies beyond that. This has all resulted from some type of world war that is pretty vague. One big thing confuses me is the technology, there are hovercrafts and tracking devices and video camera and various mentions of downloading data but they don't have computers?

No internet?

I'm not even talking about a world wide web, but some form of email or digital communication? No phones?