Biochemistry laboratory modern theory and techniques pdf


 

The preparation of Biochemistry Laboratory: Modern Theory and Techniques, ruthenpress.info Biochemistry Laboratory: Modern Theory and Techniques (2-downloads). Pages Chemical Analysis: Modern Instrumentation Methods and Techniques. Biochemistry Laboratory - Modern Theory and Techniques (2nd Edition)- Rodney F. Boyer Ignas Aleliūnas.

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Biochemistry Laboratory Modern Theory And Techniques Pdf

Biochemistry Laboratory. Modern Theory and Techniques - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read book online. The preparation of Biochemistry Laboratory: Modern Theory and Techniques, for general laboratory Web wtc) A link to an online, PDF-vcnaon of the porter t*. Biochemistry Laboratory - Modern Theory and Techniques (2nd Edition)- Rodney F. Boyerpdf.

Sugars are carbohydrates, but not all carbohydrates are sugars. There are more carbohydrates on Earth than any other known type of biomolecule; they are used to store energy and genetic information , as well as play important roles in cell to cell interactions and communications. The simplest type of carbohydrate is a monosaccharide , which among other properties contains carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, mostly in a ratio of generalized formula CnH2nOn, where n is at least 3. A monosaccharide can switch between acyclic open-chain form and a cyclic form. The open-chain form can be turned into a ring of carbon atoms bridged by an oxygen atom created from the carbonyl group of one end and the hydroxyl group of another. The cyclic molecule has a hemiacetal or hemiketal group, depending on whether the linear form was an aldose or a ketose. These forms are called furanoses and pyranoses , respectively—by analogy with furan and pyran , the simplest compounds with the same carbon-oxygen ring although they lack the carbon-carbon double bonds of these two molecules. For example, the aldohexose glucose may form a hemiacetal linkage between the hydroxyl on carbon 1 and the oxygen on carbon 4, yielding a molecule with a 5-membered ring, called glucofuranose. The same reaction can take place between carbons 1 and 5 to form a molecule with a 6-membered ring, called glucopyranose. Cyclic forms with a 7-atom ring called heptoses are rare. Two monosaccharides can be joined together by a glycosidic or ether bond into a disaccharide through a dehydration reaction during which a molecule of water is released. The reverse reaction in which the glycosidic bond of a disaccharide is broken into two monosaccharides is termed hydrolysis. The best-known disaccharide is sucrose or ordinary sugar , which consists of a glucose molecule and a fructose molecule joined together.

Gina M. Cheselka Project Manager, Production: Nick Sklitsis Operations Specialist: Maura Zaldivar Art Director: Jayne Conte Cover Designer: Connie Long Art Editor: Ronda Whitson Photo Research Manager: Elaine Soares Photo Researcher: Dian Lofton Text Permissions Editor: Beth Wollar Senior Media Producer: Angela Bernhardt Media Producer: Liz Winer Media Production Coordinator: Kami Bevington Cover photo credit: No part of this book may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher.

However, the author and publisher cannot beheld liable for any injury or damage that may occur during the performance of the procedures.

It is assumed that before anyexperiment is initiated, a Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS for each chemical used will have been studied by the instructorand students to ensure its safe handling and disposal. Front cover: The molecular structure is that of the hexameric form of the human hormone insulin, grouped around two zincions.

The protein hexamer is thought to be the form in which insulin is stored in the beta cells of the pancreas and secretedinto the blood. Trabalho Ginastica Acrobatica Aug 16, Similar documents.

Rome September, PDF. They can be joined together in one long linear chain, or they may be branched. Two of the most common polysaccharides are cellulose and glycogen , both consisting of repeating glucose monomers. Cellulose is an important structural component of plant's cell walls and glycogen is used as a form of energy storage in animals. Sugar can be characterized by having reducing or non-reducing ends. A reducing end of a carbohydrate is a carbon atom that can be in equilibrium with the open-chain aldehyde aldose or keto form ketose.

If the joining of monomers takes place at such a carbon atom, the free hydroxy group of the pyranose or furanose form is exchanged with an OH-side-chain of another sugar, yielding a full acetal. This prevents opening of the chain to the aldehyde or keto form and renders the modified residue non-reducing. Lactose contains a reducing end at its glucose moiety, whereas the galactose moiety forms a full acetal with the C4-OH group of glucose.

Saccharose does not have a reducing end because of full acetal formation between the aldehyde carbon of glucose C1 and the keto carbon of fructose C2. Main articles: Lipid , Glycerol , and Fatty acid Structures of some common lipids.

ISBN 13: 9780136043027

At the top are cholesterol and oleic acid. At the bottom is the common phospholipid , phosphatidylcholine. Some lipids are linear, open chain aliphatic molecules, while others have ring structures.

Some are aromatic with a cyclic [ring] and planar [flat] structure while others are not. Some are flexible, while others are rigid. In triglycerides , the main group of bulk lipids, there is one molecule of glycerol and three fatty acids.

Fatty acids are considered the monomer in that case, and may be saturated no double bonds in the carbon chain or unsaturated one or more double bonds in the carbon chain. In general, the bulk of their structure is nonpolar or hydrophobic "water-fearing" , meaning that it does not interact well with polar solvents like water.

Another part of their structure is polar or hydrophilic "water-loving" and will tend to associate with polar solvents like water.

[PDF Download] Biochemistry Laboratory: Modern Theory and Techniques (2nd Edition) [Download]

This makes them amphiphilic molecules having both hydrophobic and hydrophilic portions. In the case of cholesterol , the polar group is a mere —OH hydroxyl or alcohol. In the case of phospholipids, the polar groups are considerably larger and more polar, as described below.

Most oils and milk products that we use for cooking and eating like butter , cheese , ghee etc.

Vegetable oils are rich in various polyunsaturated fatty acids PUFA. Lipid-containing foods undergo digestion within the body and are broken into fatty acids and glycerol, which are the final degradation products of fats and lipids. Lipids, especially phospholipids , are also used in various pharmaceutical products , either as co-solubilisers e. Proteins are very large molecules—macro-biopolymers—made from monomers called amino acids. The side chain "R" is different for each amino acid of which there are 20 standard ones.

It is this "R" group that made each amino acid different, and the properties of the side-chains greatly influence the overall three-dimensional conformation of a protein.

Some amino acids have functions by themselves or in a modified form; for instance, glutamate functions as an important neurotransmitter. Amino acids can be joined via a peptide bond. In this dehydration synthesis, a water molecule is removed and the peptide bond connects the nitrogen of one amino acid's amino group to the carbon of the other's carboxylic acid group. The resulting molecule is called a dipeptide , and short stretches of amino acids usually, fewer than thirty are called peptides or polypeptides.

Biochemistry Laboratory: Modern Theory and Techniques (2-downloads) by Rodney Boyer - PDF Drive

Longer stretches merit the title proteins. As an example, the important blood serum protein albumin contains amino acid residues. A schematic of hemoglobin. The red and blue ribbons represent the protein globin ; the green structures are the heme groups. For instance, movements of the proteins actin and myosin ultimately are responsible for the contraction of skeletal muscle. One property many proteins have is that they specifically bind to a certain molecule or class of molecules—they may be extremely selective in what they bind.

Antibodies are an example of proteins that attach to one specific type of molecule. Antibodies are composed of heavy and light chains.

Two heavy chains would be linked to two light chains through disulfide linkages between their amino acids. Antibodies are specific through variation based on differences in the N-terminal domain. Probably the most important proteins, however, are the enzymes. Virtually every reaction in a living cell requires an enzyme to lower the activation energy of the reaction. These molecules recognize specific reactant molecules called substrates ; they then catalyze the reaction between them.

By lowering the activation energy , the enzyme speeds up that reaction by a rate of or more; a reaction that would normally take over 3, years to complete spontaneously might take less than a second with an enzyme. The enzyme itself is not used up in the process, and is free to catalyze the same reaction with a new set of substrates.

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