Fast food nation schlosser pdf


 

'One of the best reasons to read Eric Schlosser's blazing critique of the American fast-food industry is his bleak portrayal of the alienation of millions of low-paid. PDF | On Aug 1, , Tapia Granados José A and others published Fast Food book entitled Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser, and he wanted to use that. Eric Schlosser is a correspondent with The Atlantic Monthly with many fine Fast Food Nation, his first book, has been on the best seller lists for many months.

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Fast Food Nation Schlosser Pdf

Schlosser then turns a critical eye toward the hot topic of globalization -- a phenomenon launched by fast food. FAST FOOD NATION is a groundbreaking work of. Editorial Reviews. ruthenpress.info Review. On any given day, one out of four Americans opts for a or Gift Card · Share. Kindle App Ad. Look inside this book. Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal by [ Schlosser. New York Times Bestseller “Schlosser has a flair for dazzling scene-setting and an arsenal of startling facts Fast Food Nation points the way but, to resurrect.

Background[ edit ] Rolling Stone asked Schlosser to write an article looking at America through fast food in after reading his article on migrants in Atlantic Monthly. Karcher and the McDonald brothers , examining their roles as pioneers of the fast-food industry in southern California. This discussion is followed by an examination of Ray Kroc and Walt Disney 's complicated relationship before ending with the consideration of the intricate, profitable methods of advertising to children. Next, Schlosser visits Colorado Springs, CO and investigates the life and working conditions of the typical fast-food industry employee, learning how fast-food restaurants pay minimum wage to a higher proportion of their employees than any other American industry. Schlosser follows this with a discussion of the life of a typical rancher, considering the difficulties presented to the agricultural world in a new economy. Schlosser's critique is particularly strong when analyzing the meatpacking industry, which he tags as the most dangerous job in America. In the final chapter, Schlosser considers how fast food has matured as an American cultural export following the Cold War and how the collapse of Soviet Communism allowed the mass spread of American goods and services, especially fast food. As a result, the rest of the world is catching up with America's rising obesity rates. In the afterword, he looks back at the relevance and criticism of the first edition and how it inspired other works as well as how the fast food industry has evolved in the ten years following the book, including its effects on policy and childhood obesity rates. He concluded that, given the swift, decisive and effective action that took place as a result of this interest and intervention, many of the problems documented in the book are solvable, given enough political will. The afterword can also be read in an article penned by Schlosser at The Daily Beast. It is co-authored by journalist Charles Wilson Reception[ edit ] Rob Walker, writing for The New York Times , remarks that "Schlosser is a serious and diligent reporter"" and that "Fast Food Nation isn't an airy deconstruction but an avalanche of facts and observations as he examines the fast-food process from meat to marketing. Moreover, that report doesn't address fast food specifically and in fact Schlosser builds his numbers from figures including E. In clean, sober prose packed with facts, he strips away the carefully crafted feel-good veneer of fast food and shows how the industry's astounding success has been achieved, and is sustained, at an equally astounding cost—to the nation's health, environment, economy, and culture.

Tales of Parasites and People. Robert S. Review "Schlosser is a serious and diligent reporter Read more. Product details Paperback: Mariner Books; Revised ed. English ISBN Start reading Fast Food Nation: Don't have a Kindle? Try the Kindle edition and experience these great reading features: Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review.

Read reviews that mention food industry food nation eric schlosser meatpacking upton sinclair dark side united states must read food chains food restaurants eye opening think twice eye opener mad cow burger king high school big mac ray kroc well written required reading. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews.

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Paperback Verified download. The reason I chose this book because it uncovers the horrors behind fast food besides the obvious health implications fast food has on people.

I also chose it because it can relate to health class. I can talk my students about how easy it is for E-coli to develop and spread. All it takes is one time of not cleaning you knives or cutting board to get it. Fresh meat, vegetables and fruits are healthier than processed food.

This book relates so well with health implications because if other countries are gaining weight because of our fast food than fast food is the problem. We should try to stay away from it as much as possible if we want to live long and healthy lives.

Kindle Edition Verified download.

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Unlike the restaurants and food preparatory processes discussed, the statistics and case studies of Fast Food Nation are palatable. The book succeeds in taking a complex industry, introducing the reader to its history in the context of American industrial development, and disassembling it out by its major components.

One of the more memorable sections of the book focuses on fast food employees, the growing standardization of their roles over time, and the extreme measures some companies pursue in order to avoid any consequences of hiring an inconsistent, unreliable workforce.

Fast Food Nation makes a great effort to identify many of the cultural, personal, and political issues in play within the fast food industry, though it does little to incite change.

If the book presented concrete solutions, I do not recall many of them, it works better as a highlight reel of atrocity rather than a meditation on possible improvements. I read the book in , 11 years after Fast Food Nation was originally published but I have failed to see any of the changes highlighted in the book taking hold. Democracy still appears to be smothered by special interests and lobbying, and despite other media emphasizing the horrifying state of our food industry we seem stuck in that same feedback loop.

Ultimately Fast Food Nation will open your eyes to many of the issues in the fast food industry, though perhaps the greatest lesson is how much more it will take to actually incite change. The purpose of this book, about the fast food industry, is best summarized by the author within the introduction: In some cases such as the malling and sprawling of the West the fast food industry has been a catalyst and a symptom of larger economic trends.

In other cases such as the rise of franchising and the spread of obesity fast food has played a more central role.

By tracing the diverse influences of fast food I hope to shed light not only on the workings of an important industry, but also on a distinctively American way of viewing the world. However, what most of us do not know is: Eric goes on to investigate every aspect of the fast food industry: The storytelling techniques that he uses throughout the book bring this expose to life.

Fast Food Nation

The stories are descriptive, personal and touching. A very educative and enlightening read, and a rude much needed awakening about the food industry in general and the fast food industry in particular. Below are key excerpts from the book that I found particularly insightful: The twenty-first will no doubt be marked by a struggle to curtail excessive corporate power.

The great challenge now facing countries throughout the world is how to find a proper balance between the efficiency and the amorality of the market. The low price of a fast food hamburger does not reflect its real cost - and should.

He concluded that, given the swift, decisive and effective action that took place as a result of this interest and intervention, many of the problems documented in the book are solvable, given enough political will.

Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal

The afterword can also be read in an article penned by Schlosser at The Daily Beast. It is co-authored by journalist Charles Wilson Reception[ edit ] Rob Walker, writing for The New York Times , remarks that "Schlosser is a serious and diligent reporter"" and that "Fast Food Nation isn't an airy deconstruction but an avalanche of facts and observations as he examines the fast-food process from meat to marketing.

Moreover, that report doesn't address fast food specifically and in fact Schlosser builds his numbers from figures including E. In clean, sober prose packed with facts, he strips away the carefully crafted feel-good veneer of fast food and shows how the industry's astounding success has been achieved, and is sustained, at an equally astounding cost—to the nation's health, environment, economy, and culture.

By systematically dismantling the industry's various aspects, Schlosser establishes a seminal argument for true wrongs at the core of modern America. Schlosser's book, 'Fast Food Nation,' categorizes the entire fast-food industry in such a negative light.

And then the Reagan and Bush administrations stood aside and allowed the meatpacking industry to bust unions, to hire strikebreakers and scabs, to not only hire illegal immigrants for these jobs but to transport them here from Mexico in company buses. Now meatpacking is one of the nation's lowest paying industrial jobs as well as one of the most dangerous.

I'm sure other companies, in other industries, are contemplating the same tactics. And it just can't be allowed.

In his epilogue, Schlosser calls for meatpacking companies to be held accountable for the products they sell and for the federal government to be given the power to recall tainted meat and to impose stiff fines for violations of that policy. Schlosser would like to see worker safety improved.

He recommends slowing down the production line from between cattle an hour to , the levels that are current in Western Europe and Australia.

In the end, however, Schlosser is not optimistic about any legislation proposing wholesale reforms ever being introduced. The meatpacking and restaurant industries simply have too much clout in Congress to expect any changes. At the most basic level, it changes the lives, the aspirations, and the very identity of many individual Americans. The immigration law had a major impact in the direction of the meat-processing industry by creating surplus labor pools with spiraling family chain migration and massive refugee resettlement operations.

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