Drums for dummies 2nd edition pdf


 

DUMmIES 2ND ‰ EDITION Drums FOR DUMmIES 2ND by Jeff Strong ‰ EDITION Drums For Dummies®, 2nd Edition Published by Wiley Publishing, Inc. Drums For Dummies, 2nd Edition. Drums For Dummies, 2nd Edition. prev ISBN : July Pages. E-Book $ · Paperback $ Download EBOOK Drums For Dummies (2Nd Edi Ebook Read NOW PDF EPUB KINDLE - ruthenpress.info - Drums.

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Drums For Dummies 2nd Edition Pdf

Drums For Dummies By Jeff Strong Never ever leave this book prior to downloading this interactive book-and-CD package makes it easy to pick up the basics. PDF Drive is your search engine for PDF files. Screenwriting FOR DUMmIES‰ 2ND EDITION by Laura Schellhardt Adjunct Professor,Northwestern. Drums for Dummies [With CD-ROM] book. Read 3 reviews from the world's largest community for readers.

The concept of combining the drums and the bass truly makes this a unique and definitive resource for all percussionists. It is not just drummers, but all musicians who wish to improve their own pace. Lesson 4: Master 8-Beat Combining rhythms and coordinating hands and feet. Also useful for school performances! Technical work - bits and pieces concerning rudiments and 'work outs' for technical development. Really, this one is one of the best! This one Volume 1 has a. The charts are the real deal, and Dave treats you as a peer as he prepares you to run the charts. This book contains beat fill combinations from basic to advanced levels. Add new comment. No matter how, where or what you play, groovin should be of the utmost importance to you. Includes a roadmap chart for each tune.

Enter the drum. A well-made and well-tuned drum can produce all the subtle dynamic textures of a finely crafted violin and create a variety of pleasing sounds, whereas a soup pot only clanks when you hit it. In this chapter I introduce you to some drums, both the modern drumset and traditional styles.

I also explain why a drum sounds better than a cardboard box, and I let you know when you should use your hands, or when arming yourself with sticks works better.

Most are round, but some are octagonal. Some are shallow and others are deep. Some are shaped like bowls or cylinders, others like goblets or an hourglass. Some you beat with sticks, while others you strike with hands or fingers.

See Figure for a few drum shapes and sizes. The hardware can be as simple as tacks nailed through the head into the shell, or it can be as elaborate as gold-plated cast metal rims with bolts that are tightened to precise torque tolerances try saying that ten times fast. Either way, they all do the same thing: They create tension on the head so that it can vibrate freely against the edge of the shell.

Check out Figure for a few hardware styles. Figure Drums come in all shapes and sizes. Exploring How Drums Create Sound When you hit a drum, the head vibrates much the same way as a guitar string vibrates when you pluck it. This motion makes the shell vibrate too. The result is the sound of sweet music.

Amazingly enough, this action all happens in a fraction of a second. All these factors determine why drums can sound so many different ways and still be just a head, a shell, and some hardware. Timbre is a fancy word for the quality of sound produced by an instrument.

This timbre is why not all acoustic guitars or violins cost the same amount. For these instruments, the better the timbre, the higher the price. Figure A variety of hardware styles. So, the important thing to remember here is that the larger the diameter of drum, the deeper the sound, and the longer the shell, the louder the sound. As always, some exceptions exist, but for the most part you can count on this idea being true.

Deconstructing the Drumset Once upon a time, you played drums one at a time. Each drummer played only one drum, and in order to make bigger and better noise — er, music — more drummers were needed. Then somewhere along the way, innovative drummers started putting groups of drums together and beating them all at once. Bass drum. The bass drum usually sits on its side on the floor and is played by stepping on a pedal with the right foot. This drum is generally between 18 and 24 inches in diameter and between 14 and 18 inches deep.

Snare drum.

Drum Book For Beginners Pdf Download

When you strike the drum, the bottom head vibrates against the snares. What you hear is a hissing sound. The snare drum creates the backbeat the driving rhythm that you hear in most popular music; you can find out more about backbeats in Chapter 6 of the music and is what makes you want to dance.

The tom-toms are pitched drums that are usually between 9 and 18 inches in diameter. A drumset commonly has at least two, if not three, of them some drummers, such as Neil Peart from the s rock band Rush, have dozens of tom-toms, so go wild if you want to.

Generally, the largest tom-tom called a floor tom is set up on the floor with legs that are attached to the shell of the drum. The smaller tom-toms often called ride toms are attached to a stand, which extends up from the bass drum or from the floor next to the bass drum. These drums are used for fills a fill is a break in the main drumbeat, as I cover in Chapter 13 or as a substitute for the snare drum in some parts of songs.

Hi-hat cymbals. Drum Basics. Chapter 2: Chapter 3: Tapping into Drumming Techniques. Chapter 4: Getting a Handle on Hand Drumming Techniques.

Drums For Dummies

Part II: Digging into the Drumset. Chapter 5: Settling In Behind the Drumset. Chapter 6: Rolling into Rock Drumming. Chapter 7: Beating the Blues. Chapter 8: Chapter 9: Swinging into Jazz. Chapter Looking at Latin and Caribbean Styles. Ratcheting up Your Rock Drumming. Part III: Dressing up Your Drumset Skills.

Jeff Porcaro Getting Into the Groove. Expressing Yourself with Fills and Licks. Flying Solo. Handling Hand Drums. Singling Out Stick-Played Drums. Exploring Other Percussion Instruments. Jamming with World Rhythms.

Using More Rhythms for Better Sound Playing Well with Others Selecting a Drum of Your Own. The Extras Tuning and Maintaining Your Drums. Ten Tips for Finding a Drum Instructor.

Chances are that if you picked up this book, you fit into this category as well. My purpose with this book is to introduce you to as many types of drums and drumming styles as I can in pages.

And by knowing a variety of playing techniques, you can end up being a much better and more versatile drummer. I also expose you to traditional techniques that you can easily incorporate into your drumset playing.

Unlike most drum books, Drums For Dummies, 2nd Edition goes beyond the modern drumset and also includes a variety of traditional drums and percussion instruments. For the traditionalist or drum circle enthusiast, Drums For Dummies, 2nd Edition includes descriptions of how to play a variety of traditional hand and stick-played drums as well as some common percussion instruments.

The result: You can learn how to actually play the drums much sooner and without learning unnecessary stuff. You can find a variety of drums from around the world that you may not have ever seen or heard of before now.

I explain each of these drums, and I describe their technique so that you can play them in the traditional way using traditional rhythms. I also discuss how you can use each of these drums in a musical situation today. By no means does this book cover all the different drums and percussion instruments played today, but it does cover more than a dozen of the drums that I see most often. Just find a drum that looks similar to yours and start there.

Conventions Used in This Book I use a few conventions in this book to make it easier for you to understand and navigate. The CD and book together allow you to hear as well as see how to play each rhythm, making the learning process that much quicker. As with the 1st edition of this book, many of the tracks have been included as regular CD files. Well, not exactly right-handed people, but rather people who set up and play their drums in a right-handed way. Lefties take heart — playing right-handed can actually be better for you.

This information may be too technical the first time you read through this book, but come back to it as you get more comfortable with your drumming — it will only enhance your knowledge of the subject.

Each section contains chapters that cover a specific area of drumming.

Part I: Setting a Solid Foundation Part I contains four chapters that cover the basics of drumming. Chapter 1 introduces you to the world of drums and shows you some of the most common drums used today. Chapter 3 introduces you to the proper way to hit the drums with a stick, and Chapter 4 explores many ways that you can play a drum with your hands. Digging into the Drumset Part II explores the modern drumset.

In Chapter 5, you discover how to set up your drumset as well as some basic drumset skills that will help you move your limbs independently of one another. Chapter 6 shows you how to play the drumset in the rock style, and Chapter 7 introduces you to blues drumming. In Chapter 10, you uncover the secrets to playing Latin and Caribbean rhythms. And, in Chapter 11, you can expand on your rock skills by looking at the rhythms of some great drummers.

Part III: Chapter 12 examines what makes a rhythm groove and how to put together a beat that fits your musical situation. In Chapter 13, you can explore how to use licks and fills to complement the music and make a personal statement. Chapter 14 gives you some ideas and guidelines to help you solo effectively.

Part IV: Traditional Drums and Percussion Part IV presents a variety of drums and percussion instruments from around the world. In Chapter 15, you get a chance to discover a bunch of drums that you play with your hands. Chapter 16 explores some drums that you play with either a stick or a combination of a stick and your hand.

Chapter 17 presents other percussion instruments, such as the cowbell and the triangle. Chapter 18 builds on Chapters 15, 16, and 17 and shows you how you can combine these instruments to create polyrhythms. Part V: Choosing, Tuning, and Caring for Your Drums Part V provides information to help you choose, tune, and care for your drums. Chapter 19 shows you what to look for when downloading a drum or drumset. Chapter 20 explains how to tune and take care of your drums so that they sound their best and last a long time.

Introduction Part VI: Chapter 21 shows you ten ways that you can continue on in the world of drumming, and Chapter 22 offers some tips on choosing a private drum instructor.

Appendix The appendix explains the organization of the CD that comes with this book. This icon highlights expert advice that can help you become a better drummer.

This icon lets you know ahead of time about those instances when the way you hit a drum can cause damage to the instrument or your ears. You also see this icon when I present you with a technique or rhythm that is challenging to play. Certain techniques are very important and stand repeating. This icon gives you those gentle nudges to keep your playing on track.

Throughout the text, I include some technical background on a specific technique. This icon shows up in those instances so that you know to brace yourself for some less inspiring information. This icon directs you to fun facts about drumming that you can use to impress your friends.

Where to Go from Here Drums For Dummies, 2nd Edition is set up so that you can either read it from cover to cover and progressively build your drumming knowledge, or you 5 6 Drums For Dummies, 2nd Edition can jump around and read only the parts that interest you. I recommend that either way, you check out Chapters 2 and 3 first. These chapters lay the foundation from which all drumming is built. Knowing this stuff allows you to understand the information in all the other chapters faster and easier.

Now you want to move beyond those kitchen utensils to an actual drum. Well, this part introduces you to the world of drums and drumming. In Chapter 1, you find out what makes a drum a drum and you get a glimpse of the most common styles available. Chapter 2 gives you a foundation from which to develop your drumming skills by showing you how easy it is to read music.

Chapter 3 introduces you to the myriad of ways to hit a drum with a stick and shows you the fundamentals of all drumming: Chapter 4 helps you get a handle on hitting the drums with your hands in case you want to move beyond the drumset to more traditional drums. Bottom line, a drum is a musical instrument that creates a sound when you hit it. What distinguishes a drum from, say, a soup pot, is a membrane I call it a head from now on strung across a hollow chamber called the shell.

I have nothing against soup pots. Or garbage cans or matchboxes or any other improvised drum for that matter. They can be just as fun to play and listen to as a regular drum — just look at the rhythm group Stomp; now they have fun. Enter the drum. A well-made and well-tuned drum can produce all the subtle dynamic textures of a finely crafted violin and create a variety of pleasing sounds, whereas a soup pot only clanks when you hit it.

In this chapter I introduce you to some drums, both the modern drumset and traditional styles. I also explain why a drum sounds better than a cardboard box, and I let you know when you should use your hands, or when arming yourself with sticks works better. Most are round, but some are octagonal. Some are shallow and others are deep. Some are shaped like bowls or cylinders, others like goblets or an hourglass.

Some you beat with sticks, while others you strike with hands or fingers. See Figure for a few drum shapes and sizes. But, regardless of their shape or size, all drums consist of three basic components: The hardware can be as simple as tacks nailed through the head into the shell, or it can be as elaborate as gold-plated cast metal rims with bolts that are tightened to precise torque tolerances try saying that ten times fast.

Either way, they all do the same thing: They create tension on the head so that it can vibrate freely against the edge of the shell. Check out Figure for a few hardware styles. Figure Drums come in all shapes and sizes. Exploring How Drums Create Sound When you hit a drum, the head vibrates much the same way as a guitar string vibrates when you pluck it. So, you hit the Chapter 1: This motion makes the shell vibrate too. The result is the sound of sweet music. Amazingly enough, this action all happens in a fraction of a second.

All these factors determine why drums can sound so many different ways and still be just a head, a shell, and some hardware. Timbre is a fancy word for the quality of sound produced by an instrument. This timbre is why not all acoustic guitars or violins cost the same amount. For these instruments, the better the timbre, the higher the price.

A variety of hardware styles. So, the important thing to remember here is that the larger the diameter of drum, the deeper the sound, and the longer the shell, the louder the sound. As always, some exceptions exist, but for the most part you can count on this idea being true. Deconstructing the Drumset Once upon a time, you played drums one at a time. Each drummer played only one drum, and in order to make bigger and better noise — er, music — more drummers were needed.

Then somewhere along the way, innovative drummers started putting groups of drums together and beating them all at once. Bass drum. The bass drum usually sits on its side on the floor and is played by stepping on a pedal with the right foot. This drum is generally between 18 and 24 inches in diameter and between 14 and 18 inches deep.

Drums For Dummies, 2nd Edition | Music | Popular Culture (general) | Lifestyle | Subjects | Wiley

Snare drum. When you strike the drum, the bottom head vibrates against the snares. What you hear is a hissing sound.

The snare drum creates the backbeat the driving rhythm that you hear in most popular music; you can find out more about backbeats in Chapter 6 of the music and is what makes you want to dance.

The tom-toms are pitched drums that are usually between 9 and 18 inches in diameter. A drumset commonly has at least two, if not three, of them some drummers, such as Neil Peart from the s rock band Rush, have dozens of tom-toms, so go wild if you want to. Generally, the largest tom-tom called a floor tom is set up on the floor with legs that are attached to the shell of the drum. The smaller tom-toms often called ride toms are attached to a stand, which extends up from the bass drum or from the floor next to the bass drum.

These drums are used for fills a fill is a break in the main drumbeat, as I cover in Chapter 13 or as a substitute for the snare drum in some parts of songs. Hi-hat cymbals. The hi-hats are cymbals that are mounted on a stand, one facing up and one facing down, and are 13, 14, or 15 inches in diameter.

The stand has a pedal that pushes the cymbals together closed or pulls them apart opened. Your left foot controls the opening and closing of the hi-hats with the pedal while you hit the cymbals with a stick. You use them with the bass drum and snare drum to create the basic drum beat. Chapter 1: The modern drumset. Ride cymbal. The ride cymbal is an alternative to the hi-hats.

Ride cymbals range in size from about 16 inches all the way up to 24 inches across 20and inch ride cymbals are the most common.

The ride cymbal is traditionally used to create a louder, fuller sound than the hi-hats and is often played during the chorus of a song or during a solo. Crash cymbals. The typical drumset usually has one or more crash cymbals used for accentuating certain parts of the music, usually the beginning of a phrase or section of a song. These cymbals create a sound that resembles — you guessed it — a crash, not unlike the sound of a frying pan lid hitting a hard floor, only more musical. Crash cymbals generally range in size from 14 inches to around 20 inches in diameter.

Other cymbals include the splash cymbal, a small cymbal usually between 8 and 14 inches in diameter, which makes a little splash-type sound. The splash cymbal is kind of a softer, watery-sounding version of the popular crash cymbal. These accent cymbals have become common over the last couple of decades or so.

Chinese cymbals have a slightly rougher, clangier sound than a crash cymbal more like a garbage can lid. They range in size from around 12 inches to 20 inches and usually have an upturned outer edge. These cymbals were really popular additions to drumsets during the stadium rock era in the s when drumsets were huge and drum solos were a staple.

Gongs actually come in many shapes and sizes, but the most popular are large up to three feet across and very loud. Appreciating the Old-timers: Traditional Drums People have been playing drums since they discovered that banging a stick against a log made a pleasing sound or at least a loud one. Unlike most musical instruments, you can find drums in all parts of the world. Different cultures created different drums based upon the materials they had on hand, their rhythmic sensibilities, and whether they were nomadic or agrarian people people who moved around a lot developed smaller, lighter drums.

As a result, you see an awful lot of different types of drums in the world. The dawn of the drumset Early forms of drumsets consisted of two or three hand drums lashed together and played by one person. The modern drumset was first developed with the emergence of jazz music early in the 20th century. Early jazz drummers put together the drums and cymbals used in military bands and folk music in order to be able to play all of these instruments by themselves.

This setup allowed one drummer to use a variety of drums and cymbals that best complemented the music of the other musicians in the band.

Drum Basics The most common traditional drums include the conga, which is a barrelshaped drum from Cuba; the West African, goblet-shaped djembe; the Surdo bass drum from Brazil; and the frame drum, which has a very narrow shell and comes from a variety of places all around the world see Figure In Chapters 15—17, I introduce you to a wide variety of drums and other traditional percussion instruments.

Just as you have a wide variety of drum styles in the world, you also have a bunch of ways to play them. Some drums require hands or fingers while others require the use of sticks to produce their characteristic sounds. Still others utilize both hands and sticks. The stick tapers down at about the last 2 or 3 inches called the shoulder to a beaded tip, which is what strikes the drum. The tip is made of either wood or nylon. The nylon-tipped stick produces a crisper and brighter sound than the wood-tipped stick.

Figure shows you a typical drumstick. Some of the more traditional drums have other types of sticks. See Figure for a variety of stick shapes and sizes. Setting a Solid Foundation Figure The most common drumstick used today. A variety of drumsticks. Regardless of its shape or size, a stick can create a louder, sharper sound than a hand, but a hand can create more subtle textures than a stick.

With your hand, you can slap, pound, brush, fan, or tap for more about these and other hand strokes, check out Chapter 4. You can use your whole hand or just your fingertips. In many ways, this versatility allows hand drummers to create an almost limitless variety of sounds on a drum. You can be a great drummer and never set your eyes on a piece of music. Or you can trade rhythms with other drummers over the Internet. Or you can. And I guarantee that any time that you spend learning the basics of music notation is well worth it.

In this book, I use regular musical notation and terms. Doing so has two advantages: All the rhythms written in this book are on the CD. All you need to do is listen to the CD track marked next to the rhythm and you can hear how it sounds. Then you can play along. You can even use the CD to speed up your reading abilities. Just look at the rhythm in the chapter as you listen to it on the CD. Setting a Solid Foundation Developing a Sound Vocabulary Think of reading music the same way you think of reading this book.

You have letters that form words, which then form sentences, which form paragraphs, and so on. In music, you have notes and rests later in this chapter, you can see all the notes and rests used in music , which form measures a measure is a unit of time on musical notation. The measures then form phrases, and these phrases link together to create a song. The first step to reading is forming a vocabulary from which to draw.

Figure shows your basic music vocabulary, which includes the following terms: Your basic drum music vocabulary. Staff B. Clef C. Time signature D. Tempo marking E. Style marking F. Bar line M3 G. Dynamic marking H. Repeat I. Crescendo J.

Accent K. End bar L. Roll I M. Tie N. Grace note O. Ending brackets P. Notes Q.

Dotted note R. Rest K Chapter 2: These five lines and four spaces contain all the notes, rests, and other pertinent information that you need to play music. Where a note falls within these lines or spaces tells you which drum or pitch to play. It can have as few as one or two lines, depending on how the music is notated and the type of drum being notated. Single drums and percussion instruments — such as the ones I describe in Chapters 15, 16, and 17 — are notated this way.

The clef refers to the range of notes that the composer wants you to play. Time signature: This is by far the most important symbol on a piece of music. The time signature tells you how to treat all the notes. The top number of the time signature tells you how many beats are in each measure.

The bottom number tells you which note receives one beat count. An easy way to remember how to get the length of the bottom note is to imagine a one above it. Simple, huh? Tempo marking: This symbol tells you how fast to play each note in reference to a metronome a device many musicians use to help keep time. To find out more about metronomes, go to Chapter 19 or the clock. In Figure , the number refers to how many beats per minute you play the quarter note.

Style marking: The style marking describes the feel or musical style in which the music should be played. Depending on the composer, a music score may or may not include the style marking. Bar line: The bar line separates the measures.

Each measure is one grouping of notes that the time signature designates. In Figure , the bar lines come after four beats. Having measures allows the composer to divide the music up into small sections, making it easier to read and reference. Dynamic marking: The dynamic marking tells you how loud or soft to play. In Figure , the mf refers to mezzo forte, which means moderately loud. Other dynamic markings designate other volumes.

Figure shows some common dynamic markings. Dynamic markings found in music. This symbol tells you to repeat the previous measure or section contained within the double bar lines. The crescendo is a dynamic marking that tells you to increase your volume gradually over the notes above it. Another dynamic marking related to volume is called the decrescendo. You play the decrescendo exactly the opposite way. Instead of gradually increasing your volume, you decrease it. The accent is another dynamic marking that refers only to the note below it.

You play the accent louder than the surrounding notes. End bar: The end bar tells you that the song is over. This symbol refers to the drumroll. This symbol connects two notes together. For drummers, ties can be used several ways. They are as follows: This is the way ties work with most instruments. Here you sustain the note and hit only the drum on the first note of a tied series.

When ties are connected to rolls, you play your roll see previous bullet through the tie and stop at the last note in the series this technique is another way drummers sustain a note. When the first note in a tied series is smaller a grace note; see the following bullet , you play both notes at nearly the same time. Grace note: You occasionally see a little note with the tie attached to a larger note, particularly when you have to play a flam.

A flam is a drumming rudiment. I explain more about rudiments in Chapter 3. Ending brackets: The ending brackets tell you how to end a certain section of music. Notice that Figure has two ending brackets. Ending 1 has a repeat that goes back to the beginning. The second time through Chapter 2: These symbols describe what to play.

Each note represents a different length of time. Do you notice something? When you have four quarter notes, each one of them fills up one quarter of a measure. The exception to this rule is an unusual note called the triplet. These notes are triplets. Triplets are an artificial group of eighth notes — instead of two equaling one beat, three make up a beat. The triplet is a pretty common note grouping. Other triplets include groups of quarter notes and groups of sixteenth notes. Three quarter-note triplets equal two beats.

Three sixteenth-note triplets equal half a beat. Common notes found in music. Dotted note: The dotted note has a value that is one-half longer than its non-dotted counterpart. The dotted eighth note equals three-quarters of a beat rather than half a beat.

These symbols tell you when not to play you rest your instrument. Figure shows the different types of rests. Rests found in music. Whole note rest 2. Quarter note rest 4. Drumming rhythms were passed down through elaborate vocal phrases. Even today, if you study from some African or Indian teachers, you learn strictly through singing.

This method allows drummers to practice without actually having to play. In fact, I studied with a teacher for almost a year who never let me play the drum during the lessons. Instead, we sang the rhythms. This technique allowed me to really learn the rhythms well. Chapter 2: Adding Some Drumming Definitions Even though drum notation follows regular music notation, I use some other symbols in this book to help you play rhythms. Figure shows you many of them, and the following is an explanation of the terms: Music notation just for drums.

Count B. Stroke C. Sticking D. Cymbal E. Snare drum F. Bass drum G. Hi-hat with foot H. Small tom-tom I. Meduim tom-tom J. Floor tom-tom K. Higher pitched drum L. The count: For a drummer, the count is one of the most useful things to know, not just for reading music, but also for playing any rhythm.

In Figure you essentially say out loud the counting pattern notated above the rhythm. The purpose of the count is to help you place each note in the rhythm in its correct place within the measure.

This symbol shows the hand position or stroke to play. You use the stroke mainly for hand drums. Setting a Solid Foundation The strokes that you find in this book are as follows I explain each of these strokes in detail in Chapter 4: Sticking and hand pattern: This information tells you which hand to use.

Cymbals and hi-hats are generally placed on the top line of the staff. The particular cymbal that you should play is designated with the following these notations vary depending on the composer, but in this book they look like this: Snare drum: The snare drum part is often in the third space from the bottom of the five-line staff. Bass drum: The bass drum usually occupies the bottom space of the staff. Hi-hat with foot: Small tom-tom: This space is usually used for the smaller of the two ride toms on a drumset.

Medium-sized tom-tom: This line refers to the larger of the two ride toms on a drumset. Floor tom-tom: Higher-pitched drum: In this case, the higher pitched drum lies above the line. Lower-pitched drum: The lower pitched drum goes below the line on single-line drum notation.

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