The Project Gutenberg EBook of Acres of Diamonds, by Russell H. Conwell This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no. Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. The “Acres of Diamonds” which I have mentioned through so many years are to diamonds he could download a whole county, and with a mine of diamonds he.

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Acres Of Diamonds Pdf

Acres of Diamonds. Russell H. Conwell. I am astonished that so many people should care to hear this story over again. Indeed, this lecture has become a study . Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell. Adobe PDF icon. Download this document as ruthenpress.info: File size: MB What's this? light bulb idea Many people prefer. Adrian P. Cooper. Author of: Our Ultimate Reality. Life, the Universe and the Destiny of Mankind Acres of Dia Tüfek, Mikrop ve Çelik - Jared Diamond.

This is one of my favorite stories, because of the principles revealed. Based on a true story, it has been told with many versions. Years ago, when the first diamonds were being discovered in Africa, diamond fever spread across the continent like wildfire. Many people struck it rich in their search for the sparkling beauties, and they became millionaires overnight. At this time, Lamar, a young black farmer in central Africa, was scratching out a moderate living on the land that he owned. However, the promise of great diamond wealth soon possessed Lamar, and one day he could no longer restrain his insatiable desire for diamonds and the lust to become a wealthy man. He sold his farm, packed a few essentials and left his family in search of the magnificent stones. His search was long and painful. He wandered throughout the African continent, fighting insects and wild beasts. Sleeping in the elements, fighting the damp and cold, Lamar searched day after day, week after week, but found no diamonds.

He asks them about their neighbors. Where are they from? What do they do in their spare time? What do they want and need? To the man who does not care about the answers to those questions, he replies: The overly pious insist that it is sinful to profit on a transaction.

To serve your community and customers, you must be a strong and stable institution. You are no good to anyone if you cannot take care of yourself. To be born with plenty and therefore be without the drive to make something of oneself is a handicap. He pities the children of the wealthy.

Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell

They will never know the best things in life. Much better than money is to leave your children with education, a noble character, a wide circle of friends and an honorable name. Continually he rebukes those who believe capital is required to make one rich. He responds with a story about a man who began whittling toys from firewood and, by observing what his own children wanted, built himself into a millionaire.

Failure is the best teacher. To make a risky move and lose teaches one to act with more caution and wisdom.

He tells the tale of a man who spends half of his tiny amount of money on things no one wants. After that, he searches until he has found a demand, then commits his capital to supplying that. Conwell details the story of John Jacob Astor, who was renting a store to bonnet-makers who could not pay their bills.

He started a partnership with the same people in the same store. He went across the street, sat on a park bench and watched the women walk by.

Acres of Diamonds: Our Every-day Opportunities by Russell H. Conwell

When he saw one walk past with confident posture and a smile on her face, he took note of her bonnet. Then he went inside the store, described the bonnet, asked them to make more just like it and put them in the window. They would not make a single bonnet until Astor told them what to make. The store blossomed with success. The greatest people are plain, straightforward, earnest and practical. Their neighbors never see greatness in them.

They call them by their first names and treat them the same no matter what heights they reach. He remembers the time he met Abraham Lincoln, just days before his death. Initially he was intimidated by the importance of him, but quickly he was put at ease by the ordinary, comfortable farmer-like quality of the President.

Another lesson Conwell took from Lincoln: He remained there for some time while Conwell anxiously waited. Then he tied up his documents and focussed fully on his guest: Now tell me in the fewest words what it is you want.

Conwell excused himself. When too many great people get elected into office, Conwell says we will have the makings of an empire, rather than a democracy.

Title and position is no replacement for character. The truly great people go about their daily business with honor and integrity. What I Learned. I entered and exited college as an idealist who believed the forces of money would corrupt me as an artist. The same principles that transformed Russell Conwell into one of the most charitable millionaires during his time, will also revolutionize your life as you read the timeless message contained in this book! Want to get all the advantages of this book without reading then use my best alternative method of listing audiobooks from Audible.

There was once a wealthy man named Ali Hafed who lived not far from the River Indus. Ali Hafed heard all about diamonds, how much they were worth, and went to his bed that night as a poor man. Ali Hafed sold his farm, left his family, and traveled to Palestine and then to Europe searching for diamonds.

He did not find them. His health and his wealth failed him. Dejected, he cast himself into the sea to death. It was a diamond. Digging produced more diamonds — acres of diamonds, in fact. Are you one of those people who look for diamonds in faraway places? Is the grass really greener there? Is there an opportunity that has been in front of you all the time?

Have you taken stock of your life lately? Perhaps there are diamonds sitting just outside your back door.

Opportunity does not just come along — it is there all the time — we just have to see it. Conwell rejects the common belief that in order to be pious virtuous , one must be poor. The young man returned, poked his finger into the book and read: Conwell challenges business owners who insist that they cannot get rich in their town.

He asks them about their neighbors. Where are they from? What do they do in their spare time? What do they want and need? To the man who does not care about the answers to those questions, he replies: The overly pious insist that it is sinful to profit on a transaction.

To serve your community and customers, you must be a strong and stable institution. You are no good to anyone if you cannot take care of yourself. Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: To be born with plenty and therefore be without the drive to make something of oneself is a handicap. He pities the children of the wealthy.

They will never know the best things in life. Much better than money is to leave your children with education, a noble character, a wide circle of friends and an honorable name.

He responds with a story about a man who began whittling toys from firewood and, by observing what his own children wanted, built himself into a millionaire. Little Bets: How breakthrough ideas emerge from small discoveries — Book Summary. Failure is the best teacher.

To make a risky move and lose teaches one to act with more caution and wisdom. He tells the tale of a man who spends half of his tiny amount of money on things no one wants.

Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell - Full Text Free Book

After that, he searches until he has found a demand, then commits his capital to supplying that. Conwell details the story of John Jacob Astor, who was renting out a store to bonnet hat makers who could not pay their rent bills.

Astor started a partnership with the same people in the same store. He went across the street, sat on a park bench and watched the women walk by. When he saw one walking with confident posture and a smile on her face, he took note of her bonnet.

They would not make a single bonnet until Astor told them what to make. The store blossomed with success. India The greatest people are plain, straightforward, earnest sober and practical. Their neighbors never see greatness in them. They call them by their first names and treat them the same no matter what heights they reach. The author remembers the time he met Abraham Lincoln, just days before his death.

Initially he was intimidated by the importance of him, but quickly he was put at ease by the ordinary, comfortable farmer-like quality of the President.

Crush It!: Another lesson Conwell took from Lincoln:

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