Steve jobs biografia walter isaacson pdf


 

Editorial Reviews. ruthenpress.info Review. site Best Books of the Month, November It Steve Jobs - Kindle edition by Walter Isaacson. Download it . steve jobs: la biografia-walter isaacson Jobs Biography. Descargar Libro Steve Jobs - Walter Isaacson en PDF, ePub, mobi o Leer Online. Steve Jobs - Walter Isaacson - dokument [*.epub] FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE EINSTEIN, THIS IS THE EXCLUSIVE BIOGRAPHY OF STEVE JOBS. Steve Jobs - A Biografia - Walter Isaacson pdf. Steve Jobs 5 wyświetleń, stron.

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Steve Jobs Biografia Walter Isaacson Pdf

Biografi Steve Jobs PDF - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. Download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd Walter Isaacson. Steve Jobs, The Exclusive Biography. View PDF. book | Non-Fiction | In Steve Jobs, A Biography, Isaacson provides an extraordinary account of Jobs'. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson, Where can I get Steve Jobs' biography book? “Download Steve Jobs biography PDF” on Google and downloading a PDF is.

Steve Jobs is not a name. Or whatever noun you may be thinking of. When was he the subject or when was he only a direct complement? Steve was such a genius that he chose a biographer to the height. After the cancer diagnosis which eventually led to his death, Walter Isaacson was the chosen biographer. Jobs biography is a collection of fantastic stories, through the ups and downs of his career, his passion and perfectionism and the revolution of six major industries: personal computing, animation cinema, music, e-books, mobile phones, and tablets. Jobs was an inventive genius who knew that the 21st century was based on connecting technology and creativity. Steve cooperated with the book, but he did not interfere in any way. In fact, he did not even read the book before its publication and encouraged all interviewees to be sincere and transparent. His story, captured succinctly in this summary, is a fantastic tale of innovation, character, leadership , and values.

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Steve Jobs Biography (Isaacson): Summary in PDF

Six Friends and the World They Made. Walter Isaacson, Twitter: Tell us what you like, so we can send you books you'll love. Sign up and get a free eBook! Steve Jobs By Walter Isaacson. Price may vary by retailer. About The Book.

Excerpt 1 His personality was reflected in the products he created. His passions, perfectionism, demons, desires, artistry, devilry, and obsession for control were integrally connected to his approach to business and the products that resulted.

His silences could be as searing as his rants; he had taught himself to stare without blinking. At other times it could be terrifying, such as when he was fulminating about Google or Microsoft ripping off Apple. This intensity encouraged a binary view of the world. You were either one or the other, sometimes on the same day. The same was true of products, ideas, even food: As a result, any perceived flaw could set off a rant.

His quest for perfection led to his compulsion for Apple to have end-to-end control of every product that it made. This ability to integrate hardware and software and content into one unified system enabled him to impose simplicity.

Excerpt 2 For Jobs, belief in an integrated approach was a matter of righteousness. Their lives are crowded; they have other things to do than think about how to integrate their computers and devices.

Steve Jobs Book Biography (Isaacson): Summary in PDF

But in a world filled with junky devices, inscrutable error messages, and annoying interfaces, it led to astonishing products marked by beguiling user experiences. Using an Apple product could be as sublime as walking in one of the Zen gardens of Kyoto that Jobs loved, and neither experience was created by worshipping at the altar of openness or by letting a thousand flowers bloom.

He would set priorities, aim his laser attention on them, and filter out distractions. If something engaged him—the user interface for the original Macintosh, the design of the iPod and iPhone, getting music companies into the iTunes Store—he was relentless. But if he did not want to deal with something—a legal annoyance, a business issue, his cancer diagnosis, a family tug—he would resolutely ignore it.

That focus allowed him to say no. He got Apple back on track by cutting all except a few core products. He made devices simpler by eliminating buttons, software simpler by eliminating features, and interfaces simpler by eliminating options.

He attributed his ability to focus and his love of simplicity to his Zen training. It honed his appreciation for intuition, showed him how to filter out anything that was distracting or unnecessary, and nurtured in him an aesthetic based on minimalism. Unfortunately his Zen training never quite produced in him a Zen-like calm or inner serenity, and that too is part of his legacy. He was often tightly coiled and impatient, traits he made no effort to hide.

Most people have a regulator between their mind and mouth that modulates their brutish sentiments and spikiest impulses. Not Jobs. He made a point of being brutally honest. This made him charismatic and inspiring, yet also, to use the technical term, an asshole at times.

Jobs claimed it was the former. But I think he actually could have controlled himself, if he had wanted. When he hurt people, it was not because he was lacking in emotional awareness. Quite the contrary: He could size people up, understand their inner thoughts, and know how to relate to them, cajole them, or hurt them at will.

The nasty edge to his personality was not necessary.

It hindered him more than it helped him. But it did, at times, serve a purpose. Polite and velvety leaders, who take care to avoid bruising others, are generally not as effective at forcing change. Dozens of the colleagues whom Jobs most abused ended their litany of horror stories by saying that he got them to do things they never dreamed possible. He designed the Mac after appreciating the power of graphical interfaces in a way that Xerox was unable to do, and he created the iPod after grasping the joy of having a thousand songs in your pocket in a way that Sony, which had all the assets and heritage, never could accomplish.

Some leaders push innovations by being good at the big picture. Others do so by mastering details.

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Jobs did both, relentlessly. As a result he launched a series of products over three decades that transformed whole industries. Was he smart? The book is also structured in a logical fashion. Although largely chronological, the chapters do center around certain themes.

Isaacson also avoids getting bogged down by technological details, which can be a temptation in a book that features a computer company. Even when the technological aspects of a product are necessary to illustrate a point, they are explained simply so that even a reader who is not tech savvy can understand.

In terms of accuracy, I can only judge based on what I know from other sources as well as my impression after reading the biography. I do not have the resources or connections to go through every assertion made and verify them. I can, however, assess whether or not Isaacson appeared to be presenting an overly positive or negative picture.

I believe that Isaacson presents a realistic picture of Jobs that includes both the positive and negative sides to his personality. Jobs comes across as a real person with a lot of flaws and perhaps a mental illness, but who has also accomplished some amazing things. I did not get the feeling that Isaacson was trying to whitewash or defame him.

This is not to say that Isaacson is unbiased, but I have yet to find a biographer who isn't. A biographer must be passionate about his or her subject in order to devote the time needed to write a thorough biography, and with passion comes bias, whether positive or negative. Isaacson was positively biased towards Jobs, however, this did not prevent him from exposing the darker side of Jobs' personality.

He also contradicts Jobs' own statements with both facts and other people's accounts. I appreciated that he included both sides of a story. However, he does tend to justify Jobs' obnoxious behavior and negative personality traits by reminding the reader that these behaviors and traits also led him to do great things, and achieve the impossible. It often seems as though Isaacson is implying that the ends justify the means, although the reader is able to form his or her own opinion.

If you can ignore Isaacson's apologetic tone, which is present throughout, the biography does present a balanced picture of Jobs. Overall, I really enjoyed this biography. I would recommend this book to anyone who is a fan of Steve Jobs, Apple, or is interested in particularly influential people. Although Pixar plays a much smaller role, there are also some interesting stories about how Pixar came to be what it is today.

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