This book has an ending that has never ever been told in any retelling of the Mahabharata. This ending is the reason the book was originally called Jaya by. An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata. Shyam: An Illustrated Retelling of the Bhagavata. Devdutt Pattanaik is a master story-teller, as his several books on Indian mythology testify. Jaya book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. High above the sky stands Swarga, paradise, abode of the gods. Still above.

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Jaya Book By Devdutt

ruthenpress.info - download Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata book Sita: An Illustrated Retelling of Ramayana by Devdutt Pattanaik Paperback Rs. . ruthenpress.info: Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata ( ): Devdutt Pattanaik: Books. Congratulations to Devdutt Pattanaik for his work. Now to answer your question, let's see the proceedings in Jaya: 1. The book.

The world around me is very unsettling. Very depressing. And I was thoroughly engrossed by it. What is incredible is that it seems that every situation that I can come across or have heard of could be generalized into one of the situations already talked about in the stories of the Mahabharata and you can relate to it! Think about that for a minute. Think about how it applies to every minor situation in every minute in the office and at home or on a bigger scale at the level of states and nations. Why is it that we are all screwed up in so many little ways? Whether it is lack of trust or lack of intimacy or lack of friends or lack of self-confidence or lack of support or lack of pleasantries or lack of humanity… so on. While I did not find the answer to it in the Mahabharata, I did come to the stark realization that this has been the way for generations and has been so since the age of the Mahabharata. So I should take heart in it and figure out what are the age-old approaches to overcoming this hassled life. There is far more wisdom and far more to learn in older stuff than the newer stuff which tends to be mostly regurgitations. On the same note, it probably explains why rearing children is considered such an important part of life for our previous generations even though the current generation including me consider it as just another phase of life.

Solve this puzzle and you will solve the mystery of the Mahabharata. In this enthralling retelling of India's greatest epic, the Mahabharata, originally known as Jaya, Devdutt Pattanaik seamlessly weaves into a single narrative plots from the Sanskrit classic as well as its many folk and regional variants, including the Pandavani of Chattisgarh, Gondhal of Maharashtra, Terukkuttu of Tamil Nadu, and Yakshagana of Kamataka.

Richly illustrated with over line drawings by the author, the chapters abound with little-known details such as the names of the hundred Kauravas, the worship of Draupadi as a goddess in Tamil Nadu, the stories of Astika, Madhavi, Jamini, Aravan and Barnareek, the Mahabharata version of the Shakuntaiam and the Ramayana, and the dating of the war based on astronomical data.

With clarity and simplicity, the tales in the elegant volume reveal the eternal relevance of the Mahabharata, the complex and disturbing meditation on the human condition that has shaped Indian thought for over years.

I have already read various retelling of Mahabharata; however, this retelling is totally different from others.

Book review: Thoughts from Jaya, a retelling of Mahabharata

And they were the Kauravas, his own grandchildren. Further author has mentioned how this tale reaches to the people and how as per the time the tale gets developed. The narration starts when Janamejaya, son of Parikshit is furious as his father died due to the snake bite. He decides to end each and every snake by performing a snake-sacrifice yagna, Sarpa Sattra.

We have to ask ourselves—why do we do what we do? When we truly accept the answer, we break free from the cycle of births and deaths, and discover the realm beyond Swarga, Vaikuntha, where there is peace forever. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

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Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata

Preview — Jaya by Devdutt Pattanaik. High above the sky stands Swarga, paradise, abode of the gods. Still above is Vaikuntha, heaven, abode of God. The doorkeepers of Vaikuntha are the twins, Jaya and Vijaya, both whose names mean 'victory'. One keeps you in Swarga; the other raises you into Vaikuntha. In Vaikuntha there is bliss forever, in Swarga there is pleasure for only as long as you deserve. What is the High above the sky stands Swarga, paradise, abode of the gods.

(DOC) Book Review- Jaya: An illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata | Shafin Shabir - ruthenpress.info

What is the difference between Jaya and Vijaya? Solve this puzzle and you will solve the mystery of the Mahabharata. In this enthralling retelling of India's greatest epic, the Mahabharata originally known as Jaya, Devdutt Pattanaik seamlessly weaves into a single narrative plots from the Sanskrit classic as well as its many folk and regional variants, including the Pandavani of Chhattisgarh, Gondhal of Maharashtra, Terukkuttu of Tamil Nadu and Yakshagana of Karnataka.

Richly illustrated with over line drawings by the author, the chapters abound with little-known details such as the names of the hundred Kauravas, the worship of Draupadi as a goddess in Tamil Nadu, the stories of Astika, Madhavi, Jaimini, Aravan and Barbareek, the Mahabharata version of the Shakuntalam and the Ramayana, and the dating of the war based on astronomical data.

With clarity and simplicity, the tales in this elegant volume reveal the eternal relevance of the Mahabharata, the complex and disturbing meditation on the human condition that has shaped Indian thought for over years.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published October 5th by Penguin Global first published August 14th More Details Original Title. The Great Indian Epics Retold.

Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Jaya , please sign up. MaryNichols Mahabharatha will help to understand human psyche. It covers every aspect of human life. Is this book suitable for 11 year olds? Dhiraj I think it would be more appropriate for an older person say one of the parents or grandparents to read and explain it to a 11 year old.

That way the …more I think it would be more appropriate for an older person say one of the parents or grandparents to read and explain it to a 11 year old. That way the child will be able to assimilate more and understand it better.

Also, the story can be told in parts yo make it interesting. Else, an 11 year old reading it all by herself may find it heavy read, may lose interest or may not be able to understand the deeper, philosophical message contained in the book. See all 4 questions about Jaya…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Jan 27, Riku Sayuj rated it it was ok Shelves: I am stripping a star and retracting the positive aspects of this review well, at least in statement in light of later readings.

Pattanaik's myths are not to be read to 'know' the myths but only for fun. Think of them as a modern variant of the Amar Chitra Katha s for the modern professional who has no time for unabridged epics! Original Review: The book started well as it provided a fresh and clear take on Mahabharata without rationalizations and without apology.

Devdutt adopts a very trad EDIT: Devdutt adopts a very traditional stance and uses his small boxes to put in folk tales and other views on the topics. Some of the illustrations are breathtaking in their honesty and imagination and is worth every penny spent on the books. But as the book progresses the reader gets the feeling that the incidents are treated a bit too cursorily.

Pattanaik has a wonderful way of looking at things, I only wish he had cared to look deeper with that vision. The amount of space dedicated to any given incident is too less and this makes the whole exercise a bit too shallow. There is not much new insight in the book if you are familiar with the epic. A few interesting folk tale traditions and the author's take on what the driving philosophy is makes the book a worthwhile read but it all smacks a bit strongly of buddhism.

In the end, I was disappointed that so little was explored by an obviously very insightful author. I will be reading his other books soon with hope for more of the same clarity and less of the cursoriness. View all 11 comments.

Feb 12, Dyuti rated it it was amazing Shelves: Devdutt Pattanaik , meet your latest die-hard fan: Indeed, I had tried several times before this to read the Mahabharat in its entirety, but could never finish it. Not that I was not familiar with the stories: But I wanted more: I hungered to read them in a continuity -- for chronology, for ease of understanding, and most importantly, for enjoyment.

Until I found this book. It was perfect: Not only is the book wonderfully written, it is addictive! It is divided into parts 3 major parts: Each part has further subdivisions each of which further contain many stories. Yet, it does not, not even for once, weigh you down with the many different characters, or their complex relationships with other. But what I enjoyed the most, were the little boxes at the end of every story which contained commentaries from the author analyzing the specific event.

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Sometimes they contain tid-bits of how those stories are relevant even today, or how they have seeped into our, and other foreign cultures. Highly informative and fun to read. It is evident that a lot of research went into writing the book, and I always appreciate authors who work hard to gift you that extra something special.

As an added bonus, the book had wonderful sketches by the author himself, which were a treat to admire. Nothing elaborate, but beautiful in their simplicity, glowing in the confidence of the bold strokes. View all 15 comments. When I give three stars to a book, it's often grudgingly as I think I may be over-emphasising its merits, or guiltily as I think I may be downplaying the book's merits.

These three stars are given guiltily. Pattnaik's retelling of the Mahabharata is narrated in a simple manner, through the lens of present day wisdom but with an awareness of its absence in the past.

One of the immediate impacts of listening to the audio is that I eagerly want to read the Bhagavad Gita. Pattanaik's take on the wisd When I give three stars to a book, it's often grudgingly as I think I may be over-emphasising its merits, or guiltily as I think I may be downplaying the book's merits.

Pattanaik's take on the wisdom Krishna imparted to Arjuna, was one I enjoyed. Perhaps, once I read the translation of the Mahabharatha, I will be able to judge this work on several scales. For now, it suffices to say that it is both enjoyable and non-trivial. I also heard it instead of reading the illustrated version. I've flipped through the book before and think reading it will be better than listening to the audio. Jaya's strength lies in the fact that it interprets the Mahabharata, something that is not done by most who have encountered the tales, and it does so in simple language.

Additionally, it does not rely on the Sanskrit version alone but incorporates various folk tales from different regions. The Mahabharata is considered an Itihasa, meaning history. Personally, I don't see it that way. The value of the epic is in making one contemplate and Jaya's primary motive may be to provide a boost to those who have not borne the fruits of active reading. View all 5 comments. Dec 16, Anubhav rated it it was amazing Shelves: I don't always judge a book by its cover but in this case, the cover just lured me in.

I hardly ever write a review I'm too lazy; rating the book is as far as I go because all it takes is a click but in this case I felt like making an exception. Where to begin? With the beginning. So the author chooses to call his book 'Jaya - An illustrated retelling of the Mahabharata' rather than simply 'Mahabharata retold' or some such It is not just to stand apart from the other versions, no maam; he just I don't always judge a book by its cover but in this case, the cover just lured me in.

It is not just to stand apart from the other versions, no maam; he justifies his choice of this title quite satisfactorily before the book ends. Also, this book is literally 'illustrated' with his line drawings which are simple yet evocative. This book is divided into 18 parts. Ved Vyasa's Mahabharata is also divided into 18 parvas but there is no one-to-one correspondence between the divisions made by Vyasa and Pattanaik.

For example, in this book the great war has been compressed into just 1 part whereas in Vyasa's version, 4 of the 18 parvas are devoted to the war - Bhishma parva, Drona parva, Karna parva and Shalya parva. That is because this book focuses on something much beyond the war. It tries to find the message for mankind hidden in the complexities of this epic saga.

Each of the chapters ends with some bullet points which present alternate versions of the stories contained in that chapter, its significance in context of the overall story etc.

This was, for me, the best part of this book and what may possibly make it worth a read even for those who are already quite familiar with the tale as I was even before reading this book. It is very easy to miss the forest for the trees when you embark upon this adventure called Mahabharata, so Pattanaik spells it out for you, and I believe there is no harm in benefiting from his vast research.

Moreover, each chapter is self-contained, in the sense that there is a proper beginning, middle and end. No chapter ends with a cliff-hanger. So even though the chapters are arranged in a chronological manner, really they can be read in any order if one so desires. There was hardly any chapter in which I didn't come across some new tidbit or other, and that is when I have watched all 94 episodes of B.

Because this book is an abridged version of the original, Pattanaik has obviously had to compromise on many details. Out of the numerous sub-plots, he has shed light on only those which probably appealed to him the most. There is also a lack of poetry in this retelling which focuses more on the plot points. All these are reasons why this should not be the only book you ever read about the Mahabharat.

Nevertheless it remains a compelling read I finished it within 2 days flat and that was when curiosity or suspense was not my driving force. I highly recommend it for both Mahabharat noobs and nerds and also for all those in between.

View 1 comment. Where do I even begin to review this book? I was on my way back to Boston from Hyderabad, India and had a lot of time to kill at the airport after the security check. As I was wandering in the airport bookstore, I came across this book, read the back cover and was hooked. It goes thus, A son renounces sex so that his old father can remarry A daughter is a prize in an archery contest A teacher demands half a kingdom as his tuition fee A student is turned away because of his caste A mother asks her so Where do I even begin to review this book?

It goes thus, A son renounces sex so that his old father can remarry A daughter is a prize in an archery contest A teacher demands half a kingdom as his tuition fee A student is turned away because of his caste A mother asks her sons to share a wife A father curses his son-in-law to be old and impotent A husband lets another man make his wife pregnant A wife blindfolds herself to share her husband's blindness A forest is destroyed for a new city A family is divided over inheritance A king gambles away his kingdom A queen is forced to serve as a maid A man is stripped of his manhood for a year A woman is publicly disrobed A war is fought where all rules are broken A shift in sexuality secures victory The vanquished go to paradise The victors lose their children The earth is bathed in blood God is cursed Until wisdom prevails I grew up listening to stories from the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, but I was always partial towards the Mahabharata.

I don't know whether it was because of the Krishna's adorable childhood antics, the myriad of heroic characters each with their own prowess, or because the unfortunate tale of the Pandava brothers struck a cord in my heart.

Honestly, the Mahabharata is an epic in the true sense of the word.

The scope is so vast and there are so many characters that typically most interpretations just skim the events and dwell on the famous warring cousins, the Pandavas and the Kauravas. Anyway, coming back to Devdutt Patnaik's retelling, I think he makes it more interesting by presenting much more than the bare bones of the story. He delves into the sub-plots, significance of little known events, different folk-lores and the numerous stories within stories which make up the real Mahabharata visualized by Ved Vyasa.

I absolutely loved it, if I haven't said so before already! Devdutt Patnaik is a mythologist by passion, according to his Goodreads bio and I think he does this job exceptionally well. Any lover of Hindu mythology will not be disappointed by this book. Mar 12, Raghu rated it liked it. In my teens in India, I used to be fascinated by the retelling of the Mahabharata by Rajaji in Tamil.

I read it repeatedly over the years and was well conversant with the myths, the war and its aftermath. One thing that always stood out as an anamoly was the repeated conduct of 'adharmic' actions by the Pandavas during the war and Krishna's collusion in most of them.

However, Rajaji, being a devotee of Krishna himself, always glossed over these acts of adharma and presented mostly a sanitised pi In my teens in India, I used to be fascinated by the retelling of the Mahabharata by Rajaji in Tamil. However, Rajaji, being a devotee of Krishna himself, always glossed over these acts of adharma and presented mostly a sanitised picture of the Pandavas as the good guys, the Kauravas as the bad guys and the role of Krishna as beyond evaluation because he was God himself on Earth.

Rajaji also was guilty of presenting an incomplete picture of the epic in some ways. For example, he writes that the Pandavas, during their exile in the forest, were implored by the King of Animals to stop decimating the deer population in their search for food.

Yudhishtra agrees and moves away from the forest and Rajaji heralds this as an indication of the environmental concern of our ancestors. But he completely avoids mentioning the cruelty of the Pandavas in burning down the Khandavaprastha forest to build the city of Indraprastha, killing all the animals, reptiles, trees and insects wantonly. Hence, for me, this book by Devdutt Pattanaik is a welcome addition to the retelling of the Mahabharata.

He takes a more critical and objective look at the epic and speculates on the motives of the various players in the epic without being constrained by false religious devotion and dogma. He also brings in alternative versions of the epic from various folk traditions in Tamilnadu, Orissa, Rajasthan and Indonesia.

I found this book an educational and refreshing read.

The story is too well known to be recounted here. Instead, I shall touch upon some of the other interesting aspects of the epic that the author writes about. The author quotes Indian psychoanalysts of the Freudian school to suggest that Indian men possibly suffer from the 'Yayati complex' rather than the 'Oedipus complex'.

In the Greek view, dominated by the Oedipus complex, it is the next generation which inherits society, while in the Indian world-view, dominated by the Yayati complex, it is the older generation which always dominates society, explaining the stranglehold of tradition over modernity in Indian society.

I guess all Indians can relate to this very well from personal experience! This retelling of the epic also brings the Pandavas and Bhishma down to earth instead of blindly keeping them on a pedestal of perfection. The author suggests that Arjuna was very insecure about his position as the best archer and that the Pandavas were mostly insecure and unsure of their identity till their marriage to Draupadi.

It includes tales not just from the classical Sanskrit but also from regional and folk variants from across India and even South East Asia. The story of Krishna is part of the great epic, from his birth to his death;even his song, the Bhagavad Gita, is retold in simple prose.

Every chapter has comments that draws attention to variations of the story, the intention of the story, the rituals and customs that may have emerged from the story and practiced even today. It explains why the epic is part of the grand Vedic cosmos and how it cannot be understood without appreciating Ramayana, Vishnu Purana, Shiva Purana and Devi Purana 7.

This book has an ending that has never ever been told in any retelling of the Mahabharata. This ending is the reason the book was originally called Jaya by Vyasa. Devdutt Pattanaik is a master story-teller, as his several books on Indian mythology testify.

However, why the Mahabharata? There are several translations and retellings floating around. What value addition can a new one offer? Where is the USP? There are four excellent reasons to read this book. First, the illustrations, and until carefully reading this, I had not realized that Devdutt does his own illustrations, with some help from his driver. Second, this is not quite an abridged retelling of the Mahabharata. It is a collection of stories, which of course are the core stories from the Mahabharata.

However, these stories occur in other places too, such as the Puranas. What is the Mahabharata? We tend to think of it as the Sanskrit Mahabharata.

Unlike the Ramayana, where there are several versions, authored by several different people, the Mahabharata has been authored by Vedavyasa or Vyasadeva, more accurately, Krishna Dvaipayana.