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House Beautiful Magazine Pdf

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You can think also of the project of Mies of the glass house on the hill of , again, a dream never possible to realize.

This was built as a pavillion for the century of progress exhibition in Chicago, and so many other examples. A wall is only an idea on your mind, if you have a sense of enclosure, you are already in a room.

The glass house really operates both ways, but Johnson even experienced the glass as transparent, but also as wall paper. In another TV program Philip Johnson says the glass house was very well, for the simple reason that the wallpaper was so handsome, it is perhaps a very expensive wallpaper, but you have a wallpaper that changes every 5 minutes throughout the day and surrounds you with the beautiful nature that sometimes Connecticut gives us.

For Johnson, it provides enclosure, containment, rather than openness. He says in another TV program: 'I built this glass house shortly after Mies gave us all the model with his famous glass near Chicago. The image of the model of Mies was already in circulation in , when it was under construction.

This is very Johnson, before anyone says 'you are copying Mies', he says 'I was copying Mies, of course! This is a still from a TV program, I can never find this model or photographs of this stage of the project. Going back to his words: 'I built this house shortly after Mies gave us the model of his famous house near Chicago. I knew the plans of the Farnsworth very well. So, it is precisely this sense of complete envelopment that makes this minimalist statement an architecture.

If you are in a good piece of architecture, Johnson continues, you have the feeling that you are surrounded. In fact, rather than dematerialized architecture, glass in fact reinforces this traditional role. Architecture is how you enclose space, that is why I hate photographs, television and motion pictures. Television also arrived in the US precisely at mid century, and also it had been part of science fiction fantasies of the future.

The Dymaxion house, he claimed, was equipped with the latest media technology: telephone, radio, TV, phonograph, dictaphone, loudspeaker, microphone, and so on. But of course, some of those technologies barely existed in , only in the late 40s and 50s was TV widely introduced to the American public, when DuMont and RCA offered the first sets to the public in , and basically between and nearly two thirds of American families bought a TV set.

In , the most famous of the mass produced suburbs, Levittown in Long Island, offered a TV set built into the walls of its prefabricated Cape Cod houses. You know the beautiful story that Levi organized that all the appliances, which were still very expensive, particularly the television, will be included in the mortgage, so it was a very clever strategy, because with 25 down you could have a TV.

The amazing thing is that only one year later, the TV is no longer a distinct appliance, but is embedded into the wall, so you can say that the TV has become part of the architecture of the American house. I think that Herbert Greenwald was the one that bought the TV set for him, and I did a bit of research into that and it turns out that Greenwald was this character, which was a rabbinical scholar that came a real estate developer, and that associates with Mies in , and between the two of them did fantastic projects, like Lake Shore drive apartments in Chicago, as you know, twin 25 storey glass structures on the shores of Lake Michigan, containing glass apartments each.

Mies wanted to give city apartment dwellers the feeling of being as close to the outdoors as people in the suburbs are, who have floor to ceiling picture windows in their houses. The apartments are glass houses suspended in the air, allowing breathtaking views over the lake from every apartment, but at the same time turning each apartment into a display, can you believe this situation, why are there two twin towers facing each other, and nobody seems to be using curtains, so you have this images on Life magazine, where you can say that Lake Shore Drive apartments have become like multiplex theatres where they are all audience for each other, and in … each tower looks at its identical twin, as in mirror images.

Inhabitants seem to have been perfectly at ease, as one of the first tenants put it: 'I felt quite akin, and not nearly as exposed as I thought I would feel, now that the furniture is in place. Johnson himself insisted that the glass house has no television, no telephone, no gramophone, no noise of any kind.

You can say: no media in a house was designed precisely for the media, the glass house itself, I will argue now, was operating like a television set, but not in the obvious sense of the view the house makes possible, but one can argue that the typical post war suburban house operated as a TV set. The Johnson glass house closes itself to the outside much more radically than a stone house would do, to become precisely a TV broadcasting studio.

This model of using your house as a TV broadcasting studio was picked up later by authorities on the American house Martha Stewart, who not only uses her own houses as a broadcast studio, but owns also a country estate of four places also in Westport, Connecticut, near the Johnson house, with a series of model houses, so in the same way, Johnson had his state with series of model structures built over the year, he uses each one of them as an opportunity to broadcast.

Each time the glass house seems to run out of esteem, Johnson builds a new structure that renews the discussion of himself, but also of the early house. Back to Johnson, he builds a new house, a new structure every time that he feels like the glass house is running out of esteem, and he calls that getting a niche, he says: 'I keep building around the place because I get itchy, nobody asked me to do funny things, so I have to do them for myself, as a sort of test.

Clients always want something definite: toilets and other necessary gadgets, but I can always build what I like for myself, so about every five or six years, I build another funny thing. But Johnson knows what he has to do, he is the best character for TV. Each program becomes a new opportunity to talk about the house. The best descriptions are those of Johnson, he links this house to a celestial elevator, in which when it snows it seems to be going up, because everything else is coming down, which is a beautiful idea, the glass house is levitating.

This house was described by Michael Graves as more Miesian than Mies. For example of the Seagram building he says 'unfortunately the entire experience of Seagram leads but to the elevator: that claustrophobic box, brings visual, professional beauty to a complete dead end. The visitor can only look out of a high window, elevators are here to stay, but one is not forced to love them.

It seems as if the claustrophobia of the elevator goes away when there is only the elevator in the landscape, the glass house, a freebox, a glass elevator in a way with 4 doors. Even the black band going around the box makes sense now, it is something to hold on when the house goes up. Already in in his book on Mies accompanying the exhibition at MoMA, Johnson had described the Farnsworth house as a floating self contained cage, and Henry Russell Hitchcock, described as a beach yacht, with no provision for outer living beyond the very confined space of the screen deck and the small travertine dock below it.

This idea of floating, you can also find it already in the popular press. There are lot of glass houses there, facing the ocean, and people like them, but I say there is nothing there.

The glass house, he says, was designed as a Chinese box: you have a box, then you take the lid off and there is another one, then another one and then another one. To experience the house, then, is to move from floating raft to floating raft, each providing a sense of containment, defined precisely by the outer lines of the raft.

The glass house is not a glass box, but precisely a horizontal surface, a raft. There are no walls here, the space is defined by the horizontal surfaces. Is this horizontal movement contradictory with the idea of the vertical elevator?

This is what he says: 'the intimacy of the raft is as great as the intimacy of a closed room. That is what is hard for all other architects to understand. And then he talks about ocean, providing a safe passage. Here there is no difference between the reporter and the thing being reported, Johnson was simply a television program, a reality TV show, that run longer than anybody could have imagined. CR: [Laughs] No, no… I got it!

Philip Johnson: No…no. The huger, the better the architecture has to be. CR: Bigger the ego…? PJ: Bigger the ego, better architect. CR: Because?

Beatriz Colomina: 'Get the job', so these are all part of television programs, which are very hard to get, because in television, they destroy the tapes of most of those things. Le Corbusier was the first architect to fully understand the media, but when he gets to television, it is no longer his medium, he tries very hard, in the s, Le Corbusier thought that everything should be on television, and he gets into a lot of television programs in France, here at the BBC, everywhere… but he cannot adapt to the medium: he does all the wrong things.

He turns his camera to the viewer, he writes on the blackboard, he gives very long elaborate things, and because they cut him up he gives up. At first sight it seems—and the project has been extensively read that way—as the perfect example of transparency: an all-glass pavilion for all glass objects, in the glass city, and in this sense, SANAA is seen as an inheritor of the Miesian tradition of radical transparency.

Mies, of course, famously deployed sheer glass to radically expose the interior. This phenomena, that has been precisely to explore the possibility that transparency in Modern architecture, was directly related to medical technologies of imaging the body.

From that point of view, the logic of the sheer glass is that of the X-ray, an inner structure is revealed by a new technology that allows you to look through the outer skin of the body. Mies even described his work as skin and bones architecture and refers to the structure of the glass skyscraper of as the skeleton.

You start thinking this way and the whole history of architecture is like an album of x-ray images. This experimental designs from the early decades of the 20th century became the basis of the everyday buildings at mid-century, when the see through glass became a mass phenomena, and that is exactly at the same time when the x-ray, that was also at the beginning an exoteric technology, became a mass phenomena as well. Screening the body for tuberculosis, men precisely penetrating with the gaze areas of the body that were previously invisible, just like architecture.

Architecture is how you enclose space, that is why I hate photographs, television and motion pictures. Television also arrived in the US precisely at mid century, and also it had been part of science fiction fantasies of the future.

The Dymaxion house, he claimed, was equipped with the latest media technology: telephone, radio, TV, phonograph, dictaphone, loudspeaker, microphone, and so on. But of course, some of those technologies barely existed in , only in the late 40s and 50s was TV widely introduced to the American public, when DuMont and RCA offered the first sets to the public in , and basically between and nearly two thirds of American families bought a TV set.

In , the most famous of the mass produced suburbs, Levittown in Long Island, offered a TV set built into the walls of its prefabricated Cape Cod houses.

You know the beautiful story that Levi organized that all the appliances, which were still very expensive, particularly the television, will be included in the mortgage, so it was a very clever strategy, because with 25 down you could have a TV. The amazing thing is that only one year later, the TV is no longer a distinct appliance, but is embedded into the wall, so you can say that the TV has become part of the architecture of the American house.

I think that Herbert Greenwald was the one that bought the TV set for him, and I did a bit of research into that and it turns out that Greenwald was this character, which was a rabbinical scholar that came a real estate developer, and that associates with Mies in , and between the two of them did fantastic projects, like Lake Shore drive apartments in Chicago, as you know, twin 25 storey glass structures on the shores of Lake Michigan, containing glass apartments each.

Mies wanted to give city apartment dwellers the feeling of being as close to the outdoors as people in the suburbs are, who have floor to ceiling picture windows in their houses. The apartments are glass houses suspended in the air, allowing breathtaking views over the lake from every apartment, but at the same time turning each apartment into a display, can you believe this situation, why are there two twin towers facing each other, and nobody seems to be using curtains, so you have this images on Life magazine, where you can say that Lake Shore Drive apartments have become like multiplex theatres where they are all audience for each other, and in … each tower looks at its identical twin, as in mirror images.

Inhabitants seem to have been perfectly at ease, as one of the first tenants put it: 'I felt quite akin, and not nearly as exposed as I thought I would feel, now that the furniture is in place.

Johnson himself insisted that the glass house has no television, no telephone, no gramophone, no noise of any kind.

San Francisco Interior Design

You can say: no media in a house was designed precisely for the media, the glass house itself, I will argue now, was operating like a television set, but not in the obvious sense of the view the house makes possible, but one can argue that the typical post war suburban house operated as a TV set. The Johnson glass house closes itself to the outside much more radically than a stone house would do, to become precisely a TV broadcasting studio. This model of using your house as a TV broadcasting studio was picked up later by authorities on the American house Martha Stewart, who not only uses her own houses as a broadcast studio, but owns also a country estate of four places also in Westport, Connecticut, near the Johnson house, with a series of model houses, so in the same way, Johnson had his state with series of model structures built over the year, he uses each one of them as an opportunity to broadcast.

Each time the glass house seems to run out of esteem, Johnson builds a new structure that renews the discussion of himself, but also of the early house. Back to Johnson, he builds a new house, a new structure every time that he feels like the glass house is running out of esteem, and he calls that getting a niche, he says: 'I keep building around the place because I get itchy, nobody asked me to do funny things, so I have to do them for myself, as a sort of test. Clients always want something definite: toilets and other necessary gadgets, but I can always build what I like for myself, so about every five or six years, I build another funny thing.

But Johnson knows what he has to do, he is the best character for TV. Each program becomes a new opportunity to talk about the house. The best descriptions are those of Johnson, he links this house to a celestial elevator, in which when it snows it seems to be going up, because everything else is coming down, which is a beautiful idea, the glass house is levitating.

AA Lectures Online

This house was described by Michael Graves as more Miesian than Mies. For example of the Seagram building he says 'unfortunately the entire experience of Seagram leads but to the elevator: that claustrophobic box, brings visual, professional beauty to a complete dead end. The visitor can only look out of a high window, elevators are here to stay, but one is not forced to love them.

It seems as if the claustrophobia of the elevator goes away when there is only the elevator in the landscape, the glass house, a freebox, a glass elevator in a way with 4 doors. Even the black band going around the box makes sense now, it is something to hold on when the house goes up.

Already in in his book on Mies accompanying the exhibition at MoMA, Johnson had described the Farnsworth house as a floating self contained cage, and Henry Russell Hitchcock, described as a beach yacht, with no provision for outer living beyond the very confined space of the screen deck and the small travertine dock below it. This idea of floating, you can also find it already in the popular press.

There are lot of glass houses there, facing the ocean, and people like them, but I say there is nothing there. The glass house, he says, was designed as a Chinese box: you have a box, then you take the lid off and there is another one, then another one and then another one.

To experience the house, then, is to move from floating raft to floating raft, each providing a sense of containment, defined precisely by the outer lines of the raft. The glass house is not a glass box, but precisely a horizontal surface, a raft.

There are no walls here, the space is defined by the horizontal surfaces. Is this horizontal movement contradictory with the idea of the vertical elevator? This is what he says: 'the intimacy of the raft is as great as the intimacy of a closed room. That is what is hard for all other architects to understand.

House Beautiful UK - June 2019

And then he talks about ocean, providing a safe passage. Here there is no difference between the reporter and the thing being reported, Johnson was simply a television program, a reality TV show, that run longer than anybody could have imagined. CR: [Laughs] No, no… I got it! Philip Johnson: No…no.

The huger, the better the architecture has to be. CR: Bigger the ego…? PJ: Bigger the ego, better architect. CR: Because? Beatriz Colomina: 'Get the job', so these are all part of television programs, which are very hard to get, because in television, they destroy the tapes of most of those things. Le Corbusier was the first architect to fully understand the media, but when he gets to television, it is no longer his medium, he tries very hard, in the s, Le Corbusier thought that everything should be on television, and he gets into a lot of television programs in France, here at the BBC, everywhere… but he cannot adapt to the medium: he does all the wrong things.

He turns his camera to the viewer, he writes on the blackboard, he gives very long elaborate things, and because they cut him up he gives up. At first sight it seems—and the project has been extensively read that way—as the perfect example of transparency: an all-glass pavilion for all glass objects, in the glass city, and in this sense, SANAA is seen as an inheritor of the Miesian tradition of radical transparency.

Mies, of course, famously deployed sheer glass to radically expose the interior. This phenomena, that has been precisely to explore the possibility that transparency in Modern architecture, was directly related to medical technologies of imaging the body. From that point of view, the logic of the sheer glass is that of the X-ray, an inner structure is revealed by a new technology that allows you to look through the outer skin of the body.

Mies even described his work as skin and bones architecture and refers to the structure of the glass skyscraper of as the skeleton. You start thinking this way and the whole history of architecture is like an album of x-ray images.

This experimental designs from the early decades of the 20th century became the basis of the everyday buildings at mid-century, when the see through glass became a mass phenomena, and that is exactly at the same time when the x-ray, that was also at the beginning an exoteric technology, became a mass phenomena as well. Screening the body for tuberculosis, men precisely penetrating with the gaze areas of the body that were previously invisible, just like architecture. The technologies of the x-ray had been available in sanatorios since the beginning of the century, but only by mid-century did the mass x-raying of citizens become available at a regular basis.

It became not only a tool for diagnosis, but also the site for a new form of public surveyance. Policing the population by scrutinizing their insides, institutions such as schools, military, took over the management of the most private spaces of the body. Over a period of half a century, an experimental medical tool had been transformed into a mechanism for medical surveillance for the entire population.

You have this woman wearing a swimming suit that is struck to the laboratory table while her body is subjected to x-ray. As her photographic image above gives way to the x-ray image, the narrator—a male narrator, of course—says: 'this young lady, to whom henceforth a glass house should hold no terror, will after an examination of her radiograph, reassure that she is physically fit.

The glass house will no longer be threatening. So I hide it in the closet, further down from the sink. Mies talks about free space, but his space is very fixed.

The metaphor of the x-ray was not accidental, Modern architecture and this is understudied, cannot be understood without tuberculosis. Is not by chance that Farnsworth goes on to say about her house 'there is already a local rumour that the house is a tuberculosis sanatorium'.

The development of the x-ray and of modern architecture actually coincides, just as the x-ray exposes the inside of the body to the public eye, the modern building also exposes the interior which becomes subject to public scrutiny. A new clarity of vision, a penetrating gaze, liberates a new architecture, whose structure is meant to be as clear as the gaze looking in.

Or so the story goes, because as we have seen with Johnson, and also with Mies, actually what fascinated architects like Johnson and Mies at mid century is no longer the transparency, but it seems more the way in which the gaze gets caught in the layers of reflection.

In canonic photographs, the glass house of Johnson appears opaque, in words of Philip Johnson as a wallpaper.