“The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens is the rare art book that is actually worth Image archivist Phil Szostak was embedded with The Force Awakens art . The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Audio Performances, Book Depository Books With Free Delivery Worldwide · Box Office Mojo Find Movie Box Office. It was published on December 18, by Abrams Books. The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, written by Phil Szostak, is a portal that takes you.

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Force Awakens Art Book

The Art of Star Wars book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Step inside the Lucasfilm art departments for the creation of. Check out a preview of the new book, The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens!. Discover a collection of Concept Art made for Star Wars VII The Force.

Content[ edit ] Carol Titelman's first volume, originally entitled The Art of Star Wars, was published in amid a popular craze for behind-the-scenes, " making-of " media products such as The Making of Star Wars documentary. The book presents a range of pre-production concept art , storyboards , and publicity shots alongside Lucas's screenplay. It has been noted as a rich record of the previsualization behind the movie that gives the reader an insight into the "possibilities that might have been" in the final production design , and that challenges the "authorial singularity and originality" that normally surrounds the works of a Hollywood auteur. McQuarrie's work was considered highly influential in the production of the first three Star Wars movies; [6] Journalist Jonathan Jones wrote of McQuarrie: "Looking at his [McQuarrie's] paintings, you can recognise that the appeal of this art is similar to that of 19th century Orientalist paintings of harems and sandy vistas. Two volumes were subsequently published to accompany the sequel films; The Art of the Empire Strikes Back, edited by Deborah Call, was published in ; and The Art of Return of the Jedi was published in As in previous volumes, these books contain paintings, sketches, mock-ups, models and photos of scenes, buildings, costumes, characters, spacecraft and creatures, along with digitally mastered pictures. The books chart the progress of production from original gouache drawings to the three-dimensional models of spaceships. Extracts from the Episode I book were published in a page booklet accompanying a US "collectors' edition" videotape of The Phantom Menace in Revised editions of the first three books were published in , with changes and new material added to reflect the additional special effects used in the Special Edition theatrical releases. The Art of Star Wars 1st ed.

I own all the art books repeated to Star Wars, so of course I was looking forward to this one. I suppose that makes my disappointment that much greater. First, I completely respect how the entire production took great care to protect the public from leading story elements from The Force Awakens until they sat down in the theatre for the very first time.

But that anti spoiler vigilance has bled over into this art book. This is a behind the scenes exploration, diving into the the evolution of concepts. I'm not expecting to learn how the script evolved, but I can't help feeling the artwork and text are limited because they couldn't show spoiler content.

I wanted to have some discussion of storylines here, and see some visualization a of spoilers. We don't get any. Next, these are books really shine when showcasing the evolution of characters, locations and ships. I found some of this present Further, I was hoping for multiple versions of similar character sketches I know more exists. But some of the content you expect, is just missing. Where are the countless redesigns of stormtrooper a it took to arrive at the final design?

Where are any images of the radar dish design for the Falcon?

Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Where are the iterations of the new X-Wing? That content was skipped entirely, instead focusing on the wide angle landscapes without end! But what is gathered here is extremely fantastic artwork and images, and editorial insight into the creative process.

What is fantastic about how Disney approached The Force Awakens is they treated the property with reverence, and brought together artists who matured with Star Wars and Ralph McQuarrie art, and infused the film withy the visual aesthetic of the original films. I cannot tell a fellow fan to NOT pick up this book.

Does The Force Awakens Underwater Death Star Concept Return For Episode 9?

But I can for warn you of the disappointment you will experience. Further, I can tell LucasFilm, I expect a whole lot more from the upcoming Making of book to be released later in Please, let's get that one right.

Dec 18, Art of the Film rated it it was amazing. The Force Awakens " is a fantastic journey through the galaxy far, far away, along with its characters, creatures, vehicles, weapons, and planets. There are quite a few books about Star Wars: The Force Awakens being released - and this is the best of them if you are interested in the artistic side of Star Wars or movies in general.

Star Wars has always used the image to convey thematic ideas; and the level of imagination and creativity that goes into them is arguably greater than any other film franchise. Among the imagery in the book are early and unused concept sketches, storyboards, paintings, and even blueprints. The images are printed in high resolution so you can inspect every detail. Although this is primarily a book of art, the author has done a nice job writing text that compliments the imagery and enhances the experience of the book.

Included are quotes from key creatives that worked on the project. On the whole, the book has a nice layout; while most books group the artwork by character or the film chronology, this book does things a bit differently. The art is instead published essentially in the order it was created, beginning with the earliest concept ideas in late and ending with some post-production design changes in January So as the reader flips through the book they can see the evolution of the film's designs take place.

This has instantly become one of my favorite movie art books. If you liked the movie and want to know more about the designs from concept to completion, you will enjoy the book. This would make a great gift for the Star Wars fan. Sep 25, Neil R. Coulter rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Star Wars fans. I love big, beautiful "Art of the It's just fascinating to me to see all of the "might have been" elements of a movie, or how imagery developed from intriguing beginnings to familiar ends.

The Force Awakens is a nice production. It presents a good sample of the many thousands of concept art pieces that the design team created during the whole film production process. Costumes, props, and blueprints are mentioned but are not the focus of this book. I liked seeing how the artists and designers went back to the original trilogy's concept art for inspiration. What puzzles me in reading this book is this: With all of these talented designers working on out-there ideas, why does it feel like the finished film is all rather predictable and mundane?

I guess it's because in so many cases, the director and crew opted for the very safest choices rather than the riskiest or most distinctive. The result is a movie that looks not only inspired by the original films' designs, but sometimes too much like a close copy of those designs. Of course this is not the fault of the art design alone; it also has a lot to do with very safe story choices, where the film might instead have veered into more uncharted, interesting, challenging territory.

So I suppose a relatively safe visual design goes well with an extremely safe story. My favorite window into the development of the look of The Force Awakens is the many iterations and ideas leading to Kylo Ren's final design. I believe Kylo is by far the best thing about the movie--partly evidenced by how inevitable and classic his outfit now seems. I am very glad that they didn't choose one of the outfits that is much more of a Vader look than the final choice.

'Star Wars: The Force Awakens' concept-art book - Business Insider

Jan 28, Miss Clark rated it really liked it Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Lots of digital art and early concept art and designs. Things varied enormously from concept to finished story, the bulk of details just being decided before filming commenced!

It is a fascinating look at the creative process behind the film. I am glad that they moved away from another Yoda figure. The early concept art of Luke's forest home was really lovely. Poe - then John Doe - went through so many incarnations. Quasi-Jedi, bounty hunter, etc. They were just spitballing one theory and plot afte Lots of digital art and early concept art and designs.

They were just spitballing one theory and plot after another until something clicked. She uses an X-Wing and a lightsaber and takes on a star destroyer. The Falcon goes underwater to the crashed second Death Star.

Poe abandons Sam and leaves without him. Sam is rescued by a tribe who "heal" him and Sam is reborn. They spoke about Anakin's ghost coming back page 44! Jan 12, Joe rated it it was amazing.

This book was so much more than I thought it would be going into it. To be read in a hillbilly accent All I wanted was purdy pictures of Star Wars! To be sure, "The Art of Star Wars: The Force Awakens" has wonderful artwork bursting at the seams. But it is also a wonderful 'making of' book. It shows and tells of the behind the scenes brainstorming sessions and how different characters and plot elements evolved from conception to the silver screen.

After reading this, I'm even more impressed with This book was so much more than I thought it would be going into it. After reading this, I'm even more impressed with what J. Abrams and crew were able to put together. They had enough material for 10 Star Wars movies! Also, just the sheer amount of cool vehicles that made the cutting room floor is something to behold. This book is a coffee table essential in any nerd of notes house. Aug 29, Mel rated it it was amazing Shelves: I'm not a huge fan of production information.

I feel like knowing too many technical details looses the magic for tv and films. But I do love concept art. It's like looking at slightly new and different versions of the same stories. It makes your imagination wonder and so often the pictures are designed to give a hint of a story, to show a scene, or to describe a character. And often they are simply beautiful. So interesting I'm not a huge fan of production information. So interesting to see all the artwork, especially all the ruined ships.

The Best Clues and Revelations From 'The Art of The Force Awakens'

It was also interesting to see how poorly the story was developed in relation to the art work, how many committees and writers and things came up with it, which kinda explained the film a bit But definitely one I'd recommend to fans of the new film. Jan 02, Kevin rated it it was amazing. Getting lost in the art of "Force Awakens" is blissful.

Various concepts for characters, planets, vehicles, creatures, sets, etc, are presented in chronological order. The designs do not have to be in this order to appreciate the craft and imagination that went into creating them, however, it does help one to easily grasp how the film became what audiences saw and enjoyed in theaters. Personally, the highlights of the book are the notes indicating certain designs were influenced by previous movi Getting lost in the art of "Force Awakens" is blissful.

Personally, the highlights of the book are the notes indicating certain designs were influenced by previous movies or parts of the original trilogy. Jan 16, Jean rated it liked it Shelves: Always two there are, an Art of and a Making of. Well, there used to be. I own every Art of and Making of for the past six Star Wars movies, and was eager to get my hands on this one. What I got was a beautiful coffee table book with big, glossy color paintings but not much in the way of context.

With the script having struggled for so long, trying to make out just what the heck direction they were taking with each concept is difficult. And it's generally bereft of both character design and, my Always two there are, an Art of and a Making of. And it's generally bereft of both character design and, my favorite, costume design.

But the overall data itself is very random, and often lacks context.

So what it reveals about the movie -- and maybe even what's yet to come -- is left for amateur detectives aka fans to piece together with other known information to craft a complete theory. Here are the juiciest bits I gleaned from the book.

Accompanying some creepy illustrations on page is a quote from artist Iain McCaig that jumped out at me. At one point in development, the crew considered having Anakin Skywalker's Force ghost return, and the idea was that he would constantly be shifting between Anakin and Darth Vader, with subtle transitions in between. The art is very cool-looking stuff, but the idea was ultimately dropped. What's important about this is what it was meant to symbolically reveal about Anakin's son, Luke. The quote from McCaig says: "If we see Anakin Skywalker, because he does flow back and forth between Darth Vader and Anakin, let's see him as a character with a dark and light side.

The reason Luke is this whole new entity is because he was the first to acknowledge his own dark side -- that it was not separate from him. Instead of merely restoring the Jedi, this line suggests that the filmmakers were contemplating transforming Luke into neither Jedi nor Sith, but something new, something with more of a Remember that J. Having Luke be the embodiment of "bringing balance to the Force" would also make for a nice callback to the Prophecy of the Chosen One which, let's face it, was never resolved in a satisfying way.

Mentions are made repeatedly of Co-Production Designer Rick Carter's desire to see the contrast between good and evil depicted in imagery. An early idea of Carter's was to have a planet that had both lava and ice, for example. Another idea pg. Just because this "balance" notion was discarded for The Force Awakens doesn't necessarily mean it's been abandoned entirely.

Concept artist Christian Alzmann came up with the nickname for the droid when working on its look in summer If you can't be repaired, they just toss you in the furnace," says Alzmann.

Many on Reddit were quick to notice the shot was reminiscent of this moment from Francis Ford Coppola's classic. Follow Tech Insider on Facebook and Twitter.

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