Gaston Lagaffe, Franquin's cartoon hero. In one Gaston: Each time Prunelle pesters me, I've found a trick to stop him being the The British, for example. Read Free Gaston Lagaffe: Les Archives De LA Gaffe | Ebook PDF Online Download Here. The series focuses on the everyday life of Gaston Lagaffe (whose surname s (as Gomer Goof), there is no published English translation.

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Gaston Lagaffe English Pdf

The series focuses on the everyday life of Gaston Lagaffe, a lazy and the first English volume of Franquin's Gaston Lagaffe – as Gomer Goof. Gaston Lagaffe Tome 1 a 15 + tome 19 (PDF) Gaston tome 6. telecharger, telecharger Translate Gaston lagaffe in English online and download now our free. Gaston is a gag-a-day comic strip created in by the Belgian cartoonist André Franquin in The series focuses on the everyday life of Gaston Lagaffe ( whose surname means "the blunder"), a lazy and A full length comic featuring Gaston has not yet been published in English. "Belgisch Centrum: Brussels" (PDF).

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Also, in his first gags, Gaston was an avid cigarette smoker, but his habit was slowly phased out. Gaston alternates between phases of extreme laziness, when it is near impossible to wake him up, and hyper-activity, when he creates various machines or plays with office furniture. Over the years, he has experimented with cooking, rocket science, music, electronics, decorating, telecommunication, chemistry and many other hobbies, all with uniformly catastrophic results.

His Peter Pan-like refusal to grow up and care about his work makes him very endearing, while his antics account for half the stress experienced by his unfortunate co-workers.

Gaston's disregard for authority or even public safety are not confined to his office — they occasionally threaten the entire city. He is not above covering road signs with advertising posters or even snowmen, reasoning that it is the only decent use that they have — being oblivious to the chaos and accidents that covering the road signs cause.

Gaston's pets[ edit ] Gaston is very fond of animals as was Franquin of drawing them and keeps several pets. The main ones are a depressed, aggressive seagull and a hyperactive cat. Like Franquin's most famous animal creation, the Marsupilami , those two never acquired a name and are just referred to as the cat and the seagull. Gaston also sometimes keeps a mouse Cheese , and a goldfish Bubulle.

The animals are sometimes Gaston's partners in crime, sometimes the victims of his clumsiness and sometimes the perpetrators of nefarious schemes. They are depicted more realistically than the pets in Spirou , in that we are not privy to their inner thoughts. The cat and seagull in particular can be fairly vicious, to the extent of forcing all employees and an unwilling De Mesmaeker to wear helmets, but never to Gaston himself.

They often team up to obtain food. For example, in volume 14, the seagull distracts the fishmonger while the cat steals a fish, which they later eat together. Franquin acknowledged with regret that he had totally destroyed the original clown-like personality of the character by using him in this role.

In Gaston, instead of having adventures and doing some reporting, Fantasio has an editorial role in the magazine and, as such, has the impossible task of trying to put Gaston to work. By the time the story Bravo les Brothers came out which, while nominally a Spirou et Fantasio story, was effectively hijacked by Gaston , it was time for Fantasio to leave.

Spirou of Spirou et Fantasio was a fairly major supporting character in the comic's very early days, though his role was quickly reduced to occasional appearances. He was on generally friendly terms with Gaston, sometimes trying to mediate between him and Fantasio, usually without much success. Like Fantasio, he vanished entirely from the comic when Franquin stopped drawing Spirou et Fantasio. Initially optimistic about this, Prunelle slowly realizes that he cannot win. However he refuses to give up and sometimes resorts to drastic measures, such as locking up Gaston in the cellar or even a cupboard.

Perpetually at the end of his tether, running around barking orders, Prunelle turns a nasty reddish purple when disaster strikes and utters his trademark outburst "Rogntudju! Occasionally, he manages to turn the tables on Gaston and shows that he is not without a sense of humour. He has black hair, a short beard and wears glasses. Yves Lebrac, first presented with the name Yvon Lebrac , [24] an in-house cartoonist, is comparatively laid-back. He is fond of puns and we see him woo and eventually win one of the attractive secretary girls over the course of the series.

Although mostly on good terms with Gaston unlike Prunelle , he occasionally loses his temper when deadlines loom and Gaston's interference becomes too much. When not a victim of "gaffes", he is a lenient comrade of Gaston, and the character with which Franquin himself most identified.

He states that he will not rest until he has tracked down every useless expense in the company, and in particular those of Gaston. However, his attempts to cause Gaston grief backfire in spectacular ways.

He represents the more serious side of the comics publishing business. Mademoiselle Jeanne "M'oiselle Jeanne" to Gaston , a redheaded with freckles, is one of Gaston's colleagues and his love interest. She was first depicted as comically unattractive in a gag where Gaston needs a partner for the back end of his pantomime horse costume, and chooses Jeanne because of her ponytail.

Gradually however, she became cuter with her body turning from pear-shaped to curvaceous — if never really a beauty queen. Jeanne is a perfect match for Gaston, as she admires his talent, his courage, his inventiveness and is utterly oblivious to his lack of common sense — of which she herself has fairly little. However their courtship is perpetually stuck at the very first step. They address each other with the formal vous and as "Mister" and "Miss" and see each other mainly at the office — though they have had the occasional outing together.

In the midst of a story that was already running, he dropped Spirou and Fantasio for more than year. But he continued to work on Gaston. One when you discover that none of this is a game.

That it's something serious, something where nothing is free, where pleasures are rare and finding satisfaction is difficult. It's that moment Gaston always helps postpone.

The riots and strikes that traumatised France in brought profound changes to all of Francophone culture. Franquin's was a generation that fell in love with American culture and worshiped postwar design for its optimism.

In Franquin's case, these critiques were just the tip of an iceberg. Always a serious pacifist who opposed the death penalty, he became more and more disturbed by the state of the world. In Gaston, he mocked hunters, cops, generals — even those model Messerschmitts Spirou sold in the small ads.

But his humor grew more and more corrosive. In , Angouleme held its founding festival. It awarded Franquin awarded the Grand Prize for lifetime achievement. But that comics world he had once shaken up was different now. In sharp contrast, Spirou still had its "religious counselor". Despite his growing sense of isolation, Franquin stayed with Dupuis.

He turned down several offers, including one from Charlie Hebdo. Then, in , he suffered a heart attack. Although it shook him profoundly, Franquin didn't fall behind. In , he and Yvan Delporte took another new idea to Charles Dupuis. It was a "pirate" publication, one that would appear inside Spirou every week.

Delporte would edit and Franquin would manage the art. But they had one condition: total editorial freedom. Somewhat surprisingly, Dupuis agreed. Printed on paper slightly bigger than that of Spirou, what was meant as a centerfold risked dwarfing its host. This soon led to tensions back at the Spirou office.

According to Franquin, "We were viciously attacked. Most of the editors really hated us. This, along with the supplement's covers, was Franquin's contribution.

It was a series of one-page gags whose humor was utterly dark, concentrating on death, disasters and despair. Over the years of drawing Gaston, Franquin had perfected his style. By '77 he commanded it with a highly cinematic control.

It looked like, in his own words, "Gaston plunged into soot". Everything in its drawings was creepily alive; even the outbursts and onomatopoeias writhed. Its landscape was baroque — yet chilling in its prevailing black and furious clouds of crosshatching. Their figures are either utterly dark or a stark, trembling white.

André Franquin: Great or…The Greatest?

All are feeling their way in a universe deprived of light. Gotlib gave them a home at Fluide glaciale, the all-adult comics journal he co-founded. There, until , Franquin continued the strip.

If he had only drawn Gaston, Franquin would be a legend. These grim gags are part Goya, part Edward Gorey. But there's no disputing the fact they remain almost shockingly relevant. Would the strip have been born without Franquin's personal gloom? He liked to cite a Spirou sequence from , in which his villain ruins a fingernail while torturing Fantasio. The higher ups, he told a fanzine in , went ballistic over that. I always wanted to use that for some sort of dark comedy.

Maybe it's all gallows humor, but it's humor nevertheless.

After Sixty Years, André Franquin’s Gaston To Be (Finally) Translated Into English, As Gomer Goof

In , he used it on a poster for Amnesty International. It's a vivid and harrowing piece in which Gaston fantasizes scenes of his own torture. Says Xavier Zeeger, who worked for Amnesty at the time, "Many people were surprised by the strength of feeling in that but it shows how bleak Franquin's vision had gotten. To mark the event, they've also published a "Golden Edition" replete with extras and graphic homages.

Gaston is very popular in large parts of Europe especially in Belgium and France and has been translated into over a dozen languages, but except for a few pages by Fantagraphics in the early s as Gomer Goof , there was no English translation until Cinebook began publishing English language editions of Gaston books again named 'Gomer Goof' in July, In the context of the fictive story evolving at the magazine offices, the man behind the footprints, Gaston, finally turned up for a memorable job interview, telling the bemused Spirou that he didn't remember with whom or for what he had been called.

Gaston (comics) - Wikipedia

Gaston's blunders continued during a stressful and frustrating period for Fantasio, pushing him to go on a 4-week strike and eventually a vacation, initiating the story Vacances sans histoires.

In 4 gags of Gaston were published in the Thunderbirds Annual Gaston was christened Cranky Franky for this series. In the early s Fantagraphics translated about a half a dozen gags into English and Gaston was rechristened Gomer Goof for this one. He is first seen "on the streets of the capital" riding a bicycle while reading a newspaper, obliviously littering papers, and then appears two frames later, bruised and dazed, dragging his deformed bike, having ridden into the middle of ongoing traffic.

His second cameo occurred in the early panels of the story Vacances sans histoires fr: Gaston appears at the start of the story when, cycling and lighting a cigarette at the same time, he runs past a red light and very nearly gets hit by Spirou and Fantasio's Turbot I sportscar.

Towards the end, he is again cycling, this time down the wrong way of a one-way street, when he actually gets hit by the new Turbot II. More surprised than anything else, stretched out on the front of the car, he simply tells Spirou and Fantasio that they are requested back at the Spirou offices.

Gaston was given a larger part in the following adventure, La Foire aux gangsters "The Gangster's Fair", included in the book Le nid des Marsupilamis. Here, Gaston hinders Spirou's investigation into a baby's kidnapping. Spirou's search leads him to a fairground and Gaston, who just happens to be there, keeps approaching him. When Spirou, desperate to keep a low profile, whispers to Gaston that they "don't know each other", he keeps insisting that they do or else suggesting that it is Spirou who looks like someone he knows.

When Spirou recovers the baby, the kidnappers approach Gaston, who they know was previously talking to Spirou, and he, quite innocently, offers to show them the way to Spirou's house for what he thinks will be a pleasant social evening. Fortunately for Spirou and the little victim, Gaston keeps getting his directions wrong and he and the gangsters end up in a dead-end, surrounded by police and in jail. In the final frame of the book version Gaston is released from prison, to the scornful glances of the passing public.

In this story, Fantasio is sent to cover the inauguration of the first nuclear powered train and, since no-one else is available, is compelled to take Gaston with him for assistance.

Needless to say, with Gaston on board, things start to go wrong and the train is soon speeding out of control, leaving Spirou and the train designer the task of sorting things out.

The serial was broadcast on Belgian radio in He is featured in the opening pages of the title story, and plays a central role in Bravo les Brothers in which he offers Fantasio a troupe of performing chimpanzees as an unwanted birthday present. Gaston does not appear in QRN sur Bretzelburg published in , but in one scene Fantasio is about to endure painful agony by torturers in a totalitarian state.

He thus decides that the best thing to do is to focus on emptiness and think of Gaston. Jean-Claude Fournier succeeded Franquin as artist and writer of the Spirou and Fantasio series with Le faiseur d'or , published in Kidnapped by gangsters, leading scientist the Count of Champignac is forced by them to come up with a means of helping them with their plans. Thinking of Gaston, he comes up with the kind of recipe that the office idiot would devise, but the resulting and disgusting mixture does have the results that the gangsters wanted, much to the Count's annoyance.

When Tome and Janry took over the series a couple of references to Gaston were made in the album " La jeunesse de Spirou " Spirou's youth where a scam artist is publishing a faux number five album of the Gaston series.

And during the tale about Spirou's childhood Gaston's car is seen parked in front of the publishing company. More recently a reference to Gaston was made in the album "Aux sources du Z" The source of Z by Morvan and Munuera , when Spirou uses the time shifting machine he remarks that the experience is yucky, almost as bad as the Champagne that Gaston made out of fermented potatoes. Later in that album when Spirou has to use the time shifter once more he remarks that it's time to take a sip from Gaston's Champagne again.

Gaston Lagaffe follows the classic "gag" format of Franco-Belgian comics: The humour mixes slapstick , puns and running gags. Franquin's style is characterised by extremely nervous characters and action and very quotable dialogue.

The series is much loved not only for its perfectly timed comedy, but also for its warm outlook on everyday life. Although Gaston works at Spirou magazine and one of his colleagues is a cartoonist, the series satirises office life in general rather than the publishing or comics business; Franquin himself worked at home.

In the later episodes, the reader could discover a visual reference to the story in Franquin's signature at the bottom of the page. Gaston was hired - somewhat mysteriously - as an office junior at the offices of the Journal de Spirou the real-life publication in which the strip appeared , having wandered in cluelessly.

The strip usually focuses on his efforts to avoid doing any work, and indulge instead in hobbies or naps while all around him panic over deadlines, lost mail and contracts. Initially, Gaston was an irritating simpleton, but he developed a genial personality and sense of humour.

Gaston Lagaffe - Le Bureau Des Gaffes en Gros

Common sense however always eludes him, and he has an almost supernatural ability to cause disasters "gaffes" to which he reacts with his catchphrase: His job involves chiefly dealing with readers' mail. Gaston's age is a mystery - Franquin himself confessed that he neither knew nor indeed wanted to know it.

Although Gaston has a job, a car and his own place, he often acts like a young teenager. In the publication of Dossier Franquin Franquin had said that Gaston is a boy in his late teens but certainly not in his twenties. He is invariably dressed in a tight polo-necked green jumper and blue-jeans, and worn-out espadrilles. It is said that his appearance was originally based on that of Yvan Delporte , editor of the Journal de Spirou at that time.

Also, in his first gags, Gaston was an avid cigarette smoker, but his habit was slowly phased out. Gaston alternates between phases of extreme laziness, when it is near impossible to wake him up, and hyper-activity, when he creates various machines or plays with office furniture. Over the years, he has experimented with cooking, rocket science, music, electronics, decorating, telecommunication, chemistry and many other hobbies, all with uniformly catastrophic results.

His Peter Pan-like refusal to grow up and care about his work makes him very endearing, while his antics account for half the stress experienced by his unfortunate co-workers. Gaston's disregard for authority or even public safety are not confined to his office — they occasionally threaten the entire city.

He is not above covering road signs with advertising posters or even snowmen, reasoning that it is the only decent use that they have — being oblivious to the chaos and accidents that covering the road signs cause.

Gaston is very fond of animals as was Franquin of drawing them and keeps several pets. The main ones are a depressed, aggressive seagull and a hyperactive cat. Like Franquin's most famous animal creation, the Marsupilami , those two never acquired a name and are just referred to as the cat and the seagull. Gaston also sometimes keeps a mouse Cheese , and a goldfish Bubulle. The animals are sometimes Gaston's partners in crime, sometimes the victims of his clumsiness and sometimes the perpetrators of nefarious schemes.

They are depicted more realistically than the pets in Spirou , in that we are not privy to their inner thoughts. The cat and seagull in particular can be fairly vicious, to the extent of forcing all employees and an unwilling De Mesmaeker to wear helmets, but never to Gaston himself. They often team up to obtain food. For example, in volume 14, the seagull distracts the fishmonger while the cat steals a fish, which they later eat together.

Fantasio of Spirou et Fantasio is the main supporting character and irritable straight man to Gaston in the early part of the series. Franquin acknowledged with regret that he had totally destroyed the original clown-like personality of the character by using him in this role.

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