The new penguin history of the world pdf


 

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The New Penguin History Of The World Pdf

[FREE EBOOKS] The New Penguin History Of World Jm Roberts Book [PDF]. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can. The New Penguin History of The World book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. From humanity's origins on the African Savann. The Penguin History of the World book. Read 31 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. This is a completely new and updated edition of J.

Dec 22, Snehal Bhagat rated it really liked it In one of the classic classroom-quiz-themed Calvin and Hobbes strips, our hero reflects on career choices. Roberts was a big-picture person. And this is a big-picture book, but even though it is an all-encompassing chronicle that traces every major development of historical significance beginning with our prosimian ancestors through to the early years of the 21st century, it is no meaningless clutter of facts and figures; Roberts brings his erudition to bear on these to identify within th In one of the classic classroom-quiz-themed Calvin and Hobbes strips, our hero reflects on career choices. And this is a big-picture book, but even though it is an all-encompassing chronicle that traces every major development of historical significance beginning with our prosimian ancestors through to the early years of the 21st century, it is no meaningless clutter of facts and figures; Roberts brings his erudition to bear on these to identify within them the major historical processes of our past. All through, the text is supplemented with a variety of maps and statistics pertinent to the era. Within each section, the unifying features and broader trends are identified and elaborated upon. It is therefore a somewhat personal view of history, but only in the ordering of events in terms of their relative importance, and the objectivity of the narration rarely suffers.

This received wisdom does not represent the end of game of human progress. These concepts comprise only a temporary setting of ideas within which we live right now. Nothing more. Asia, for example, has never embraced western concepts of individual liberty.

In that area, which is now becoming the forefront of historical evolution, the collective, not the individual, remains paramount. It can be a challenging book.

I personally found the accounts of the waxing and waning of various ancient civilizations in the Near East and in India to be taxing. It is difficult to keep these peoples, so alien to us, straight in one's mind--the hallmarks of each, the contributions of each, the depredations of each.

If that were to be the case with you, I would recommend that you simply keep reading.

Drive on, and do not be too concerned about this. The reward for me personally was this. With the background provided from all of human history, when I came down to Professor Barrie's rendition of events in the last half of the Twentieth Century--events that I, as an older man now, lived through—the perspective that the book afforded was immensely satisfying. Let me put it this way.

The New Penguin History of the World

Random human insanity. This book has provided me with handholds with which I have begun—and only begun --to gain a grasp on some context within which all of these events occurred. For example, I cannot tell you how helpful it is to consider the history of the Near and Middle East in the Twentieth Century within the framework of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire along with the background of that empire itself as it existed over centuries previously. One begins to understand.

At this point in the end game of my life, I am grateful to Professor Barrie for that. Even in our age when change continues to accelerate, certain trends speed up while others slow down in an entirely unpredictable fashion. Therefore, the book in no way purports to be a vehicle for traveling into the future. Its focus is entirely on the past.

As that future unfolds during the lifetime left to me and itself becomes the past, it would be wonderful if Professor Barrie were still around to complete further revisions of the book.

Still, as nearly as I can tell, Odd Arne Westad is carrying on fairly seamlessly in the spirit of the original author. I wish him good health. View all 3 comments.

It took five months, but I have finally finished this behemoth. I took notes. It was a self-imposed college course. How does one review something one has lived with for half a year? The main question, I suppose, is whether or not the tome provided what I was seeking. Different readers will have different goals. For myself, I was motivated by a feeling that — despite history being a steady, lifelong component of my reading It.

My hope was that this book would provide me with that, even if it might inevitably have some biases and limitations. This it provided in spades. I wanted to walk away from the experience with a holistic understanding of History.

I initially hoped to complete it in 12 weeks, but it took me twice that time. For a book that focuses on broad strokes and big picture, readers will find the pages to be quite dense. I found it incredibly helpful to take notes along the way, noting years, events, and trends, and highlighting in bold font events that particularly intrigue me.

One of the great pleasures of the book is identifying parallels to modern days, albeit broad ones. For example, today just as then, most conflict is ultimately about the ever-increasing competition for natural resources. One can also see the familiar pattern of decline and fall playing out over and over again.

When a nation stops expanding - however they may be accomplishing it - the tax revenues stagnate, the military can't be supported, and the bureaucracy grows more complex, leading to eventual disintegration.

It is happening now. But it's not the end as most people think. Something new always takes its place, for better or for worse. I picked up the fourth edition, published in A sixth edition is now slated for publication March 15, I might pick it up just to see how the previous 10 years are handled, as the text is already dated e. Why four stars? First, the maps are reprinted so small as to be rendered unreadable — an unforgivable error on the part of the publisher.

I understand that some earlier editions did not have this problem. Roberts frequently employs odd circular phrasing that requires multiple rereads of a sentence or paragraph. Lack of timelines, sources, footnotes, and suggested readings are additional failings, although understandable as they might require a separate volume. And finally, although Roberts acknowledges and justifies his strong Western focus, his approach left gaps in my understanding of world history.

The southern hemisphere may not have played as an active a role in shaping the trajectory of history to date, but I still want to know more about them. This will be one focus of my reading selections. View 1 comment. Originally published on my blog here in May At the end of the twentieth century, there seems to be a vogue for celebrating the end of the second millennium AD with universal histories of the sort which had been rather out of fashion for some years.

This particular work appeared at the time when they were unfashionable, the Pelican version being slightly updated from one printed by Hutchinson a few years earlier with many maps reduced in number for this edition to keep costs down.

Judging b Originally published on my blog here in May Judging by what I have seen of these millennial histories, The Pelican History of the World gains a great deal by not being sumptuously illustrated, by not aiming to be the only history book ever bought by its readers to use, in many cases, this term loosely.

Another virtue making it a history which gives a more natural view of the past if not fitting it so well as a reference book, is that Roberts has chosen deliberately, as he points out in the conclusion to refrain from sorting events into specific time periods; each chapter deals with a particular aspect of the past, and carries the story through to what seems to be a sensible point in relation to the subject of that chapter rather than to any chronological division arbitrarily imposed across the board.

This is, of course, a particular feature of many of the history books marketed around the idea of the Millennium, most of which are divided by century. The value of books like this one to someone interested in history is to provide a wide context to areas of more detailed knowledge. I have, for example, a particular liking for medieval history, and I would not turn to this book for a history of the medieval West, but for information on other periods and areas particularly China and India Roberts provides interesting background.

He certainly has the ability to select and summarise, even in the most recent periods covered.

Looking back from to the seventies, you might expect to have a different idea of what was significant, but the only obvious factor missing is any inkling of the economic problems which would eventually bring about the downfall of Soviet Communism - Roberts even manages to point to a growing interest in environmental concerns. Roberts is a master of the broad brush, managing to make world history a page-turner and pages seem like or so.

One particularly valuable example is the context in which he places the American Revolution and subsequent US expansion.

At the time, the revolution was a relatively small matter and Europe was focused on more important things. After the war, Britain controlled the seas and also controlled the territory north of the new nation. With a weak power Spain controlling much of the areas south and west, and with France checked by Britain in North America, the US was able to expand in an essentially invisible bubble of protection created by Britain. This was probably the longest project I've ever undertaken.

It took me about 6 years to read a nearly 1, page history of the world. And, while I've been bummed to miss my Goodreads yearly book count the entire time, I don't know that I should feel bad about how long the process was.

Clearly written from a UK perspective; there were a lot more "u"s in words than I'm used to, and also there were just a few descriptions of stuff I had previous knowledge of where I was like, "well that's a bit of This was probably the longest project I've ever undertaken. This book is an amazing feat. And deserving of all the praise it's received.

I really do feel I have a better grasp on the history of humanity than I did before. I've even kind of got it in my back pocket to read another edition years in the future like maybe 50 cause let's not go crazy, this was an effort to accomplish just because I continue to be intrigued by the knowledge shared in it's pages. Though when I come back it better be in digital form to provide links to further information on specifics and interactive maps.

And not be a damn 10 pound paperweight. I'm proud of myself for sticking through the process. Since I started the book I've gotten married, moved twice, lost 2 grandparents, and changed jobs probably close to 10 times.

And that feels like just the right thing to give perspective. But 6 years isn't nothing in the scheme of a life. I hope I took the appropriate time to process the story being told. Because it's the story of all of us. This isn't the only thing I read during that time, simply because I did need a break here and there from the itty bitty type and just the nature of a historic document.

I'm glad I paced myself like that. I feel like I enjoyed this book all the more because I took time away here and there. This edition was published in And certainly not anticipating the election of Barack Obama, let alone Donald Trump. And that's me putting it in a very localized national point of view. But the book definitely makes no bones about the power America has over the rest of the world since the end of World War II.

And that's very evident in the last ish pages. On top of enjoying all the knowledge I acquired, I really do love how the last few pages wrapped up this non-fiction epic. Regarding such a document, it's a history written by historians, and their job isn't to guess at the future, but document the past.

And from that perspective, even when it seems like the world is falling apart around us my interpretation, not the authors what's important to recognize the progress we as a species HAVE made. At this moment in time even the people in poverty are better off now than they would have been years ago.

Technology has enabled us to live longer and better and continues to improve almost daily. The most important change seems to be that now, worldwide, most people are aware of the idea that wherever you start, there's the possibility that you might be able to improve your life.

Either through hard work or dumb luck or somewhere in between, it's a possibility for anyone on this planet. And that's not something many people were ever able to consider until very recently in the timeline of humanity. So while this book had to end where it did because of when it was published, it acknowledges that the story is unfinished and that's probably the most exciting idea of all.

Look at all we've done, the good and the bad since we've come into self awareness I can't help but be excited about what comes next! Mar 13, Bevan Lewis rated it really liked it. Anyone fascinated by world history will be delighted with the appearance of a new edition of John Robert's History of the World.

The Penguin History of the World

His ill health mentioned in the preface made it hard work, and his recent death confirms his prophesy that this will be the final edition of this successful book. Overall Roberts provides a great summation of world history, supplying a sweeping overview with perceptive insights, and avoiding the temptation to become enmeshed in encyclopedic detail. The themes he follow Anyone fascinated by world history will be delighted with the appearance of a new edition of John Robert's History of the World.

The themes he follows, those of change and continuity, the impetus of history and the relationship between tradition and innovation in human history are well chosen and help to find a context for this daunting subject. His overall perspective on history has changed surprisingly little over the years, perhaps because one of his basic philosophies is durable; "the two phenomena of inertia and innovation continue to operate in all historical developments Sounds like a bet both ways, however thinking about recent events it is quite plausable.

The book, it is freely acknowledged by Roberts, comes from a white, middle class western perspecive, however every edition finds him attempting to balance his global coverage further, as well as expanding the text to include more on gender issues and the environment. The thinness of material on non-Western cultures, such as Africa and Latin America is more related to knowledge than bias. He certainly has always argued strongly for the "European Age" since the age of exploration and I think he tends to overemphasise its influence on the world's population as a whole important as it was.

A little more material on imperialism from the subjects perspective might have helped, although don't get the impression that the book is a whitewash. His prose is enjoyable, although his sentance structure could be improved at times, and the book provides a servicable set of maps.

Anyone who reads this book will certainly gain a comprehensive and valuable overview of the forces of the past that manifestly continue to shape the world today, and a fine insight into the way human societies and cultures work. View 2 comments. Sep 19, Sean DeLauder marked it as to-read Shelves: The publishing company ought not to put their name in the title because it utterly changes my understanding of the book's topic.

For the glory of the Horde! Apr 10, Ahmad Abdul Rahim rated it it was amazing Shelves: Terdapat agak banyak buku sejarah dunia yg diceritakan dalam 1 jilid di rak2 kedai buku sekarang.

Kata orang, sejarah ditulis oleh pemenang. Terdapat implikasi yang subtle kalau kita menerima pernyataan itu. Antaranya Terdapat agak banyak buku sejarah dunia yg diceritakan dalam 1 jilid di rak2 kedai buku sekarang. By advocating an Italian unity most of his countrymen did not want and conspiring unsuccessfully to bring it about, he became an inspiration and model for other nationalists and democrats in every continent for over a century and one of the first idols of radical chic.

Previous reviews note that Europe's role in world history gets a lot of emphasis here, but this need not be considered a drawback of the book; for history belongs to the victorious, for they get to write it, and it is true that the dominant ideas and techniques of our age are undoubtedly European in origin.

These are uncertain times. If distance does indeed bring perspective, then having dealt with the entire span of human history across space and time from a 21st century vantage point, the author is in a unique position to comment on the outlook for the future for humankind.

It is therefore rather telling when he says in the preface to this edition " I now feel that my children will probably not live in so agreeable a world as I have known Resolving problems requires that they be clearly understood, and this book is as good a place as any to begin that process. Politicians and policy-makers everywhere should read this. I happen to know that because I circled the book for at least a couple of years before finally downloading it.

Weighing in with 1, pages of text supplemented by 57 pages of Index, it seemed both too long and too short—too long because the project of reading it would take time that might be devoted to two or three other books that I looked forward to reading; too short because any useful history of human existence seemed to merit one of those ponderous three-volume sets that in fact I would never read.

In any event quite often when I visited bookstores, I would sit down with the book and read short excerpts.

The Penguin History of New Zealand

Then upon coming to Mexico, I checked out a copy from the library and started it. It soon became a apparent that I needed my own copy. I downloadd one and was off on a long adventure. Roberts , the British historian, died in May after completing the fourth edition. The first edition of The Penguin History of the World was published in He had a point of view, as any historian worth his salt must. At this point I am going to change to the present tense.

Having lived with this man's words and thoughts for some time now, the man himself lives on for me. It's a tome that's worth diving into and putting in the time, covering every aspect of world history in a single albeit ponderous volume.

It's also worth noting that Asian history is not overlooked. Roberts makes the point that while our world culture is cle This is a long book. Roberts makes the point that while our world culture is clearly derived from a Western European base, it's important to spend some time looking at Chinese and Indian history.

View all 3 comments. Although Roberts revised this work through several editions, right up to his death in , it was originally written in , so I'd guess some readers would find parts of it old-fashioned I really can't say, I don't read much history , but for the most part the book should connect with the modern reader. Roberts possesses the main quality such an undertaking would require—a superbly comprehensive mind—plus an eye for those game-changing things upon which history pivots, whether it's the stirr Although Roberts revised this work through several editions, right up to his death in , it was originally written in , so I'd guess some readers would find parts of it old-fashioned I really can't say, I don't read much history , but for the most part the book should connect with the modern reader.

Roberts possesses the main quality such an undertaking would require—a superbly comprehensive mind—plus an eye for those game-changing things upon which history pivots, whether it's the stirrup, artificial light, non-representational communication, or Archimedes' levers. He also writes a damn nice prose, is often refreshingly direct with the reader people of the Old Stone Age were unlikely to reach forty years of age "and if they did then they were likely to lead pretty miserable lives" , and comes up with mind-expanding little remarks that make me regret not reading more history, such as: There were no mountains for the gods to dwell in like men, only the empty heavens above.

View all 5 comments. Jim Syler Oh, no, they still haven't revised that horribly wrong statement about Paleolithic man only living to age 40? Apr 09, Jason Coleman Jim wrote: And now he Jim wrote: And now here I am spreading it further. Turns out that if cavemen made it to adulthood at all, most of them lived to be years old Mar 29, David Balfour rated it it was amazing. The single most informative book I've ever read. I feel like I've learned a lot more from this than my degree in International Relations.

While I'm already forgetting most of the thousands upon thousands of specific facts mentioned, I feel like it's provided a good sense of scale, context and continuity for other things I learn in future. An exceptional book to be used as a general guide to the history of civilization and even before.

It is massive and I've read it two times from beginning to end which took a few months. I look forward to reading the latest edition. Many great historical events are merely mentioned but it acts as a catalyst or for me, an inspiration, to research one of these events further.

It should be essential reading in school, except for religious groups who will not want to read this as they have their own An exceptional book to be used as a general guide to the history of civilization and even before. It should be essential reading in school, except for religious groups who will not want to read this as they have their own books of fiction.

This sets a clear timeline for our evolution and development as a species and will spur on discovery for your own area of expertise.

May 07, Adam Rodgers rated it it was ok. I read this book for a college class.

The New Penguin History of the World

It's probably as good as it gets when trying to summarize all of human history, but it purposely leaves out so many good details. For example, when mentioning the sinking of the Lusitania, it does so in only one sentence without even mentioning the ship's name: I assume that this was done to try and make the book as uncomplicated as possible, but after putting so much time into reading this book I really would have appreciated more detail and maybe some interesting facts or stories to make it more palatable.

Too much time was spent dealing with the policies and procedures of different governments and too little on what life was actually like for the average person throughout history. It'd be a much better idea to read a book on a specific period in time and learn all the good stuff.

Reading a summary that spans thousands of years for the whole world will probably leave you disappointed. Nov 27, Jennifer rated it liked it Shelves: This is a broad-brush telling of world history, spanning pre-history to modern day events. What I liked: Occasionally a few more details would have been nice, but overall it was a good thing. I also liked the discussion of different parts of the world in the context of the same time period. What I didn't like: The writing was often ponderous and the sentences were too long.

The author sometimes got so involved in his vocabu This is a broad-brush telling of world history, spanning pre-history to modern day events. The author sometimes got so involved in his vocabulary that he forgot to write a readable sentence. Also, the history was very Euro-centric. This is not necessarily a problem, if the point was to describe the effect of European culture on the rest of the world. However, occasionally, he came across as very patronizing American Revloution, religion which was annoying.

There were also several chapters where the author was soliloquizing, delivering his interpretation of history or possible future that I didn't love. Overall, it was a worthwhile read, especially for the broad overview and connections. It's a big job to write the whole history of the world. May 16, Doug Lewars rated it it was amazing Shelves: It took me 7 weeks to slog through it. It does, however, provide a pretty good overview of history and, more importantly, historical process.

It can't provide details in every area but it does provide enough material to generate interest so that the reader can drill down afterwards into areas of particular relevance. It gave me a new perspective into historical relationships not usually covered in school. For a writer, this book provides some useful ideas. Apr 05, Eriks rated it really liked it. A rather long, but fruitful lecture. Even if the book is separated in 3 different parts, it focuses on the History of the whole world, not on a specific geographical area.

It doesn't mean that there will be a Eurocentric perspective of history, but a broader more cosmopolitan perspective. Dec 07, Sofia Batista Neves rated it it was amazing. Before reading this book I had only an overall memory of history classes in high school, in which I was never interested in. So, to me, history was a collection of moments that I was looking to weave together. I wanted to know exactly how did the prehistoric humans became organized into empires and how empires became countries and how we got to where we are today.

The book starts off with a very detailed chapter about pre-historic period, carries along through the times of the great empires of t Before reading this book I had only an overall memory of history classes in high school, in which I was never interested in.

The book starts off with a very detailed chapter about pre-historic period, carries along through the times of the great empires of the Middle-east and Mediterranean, the middle ages, the discoveries, the rise of democracy, the World wars, the cold war and the modern times. It speaks about nations but also of empires and cultural expansion and connectivity, it gives information and facts, leaving the reader to process and understand. For instance it details American foreign policy in Central and South America and then provides a general overview of these countries today.

For example it describes how Christianity and Islam influenced certain areas of the world but not per nation. I feel that proper chapters would have been interesting. Overall, I was extremely happy with this book, it may feel a little overwhelming at times, for example in the Prehistoric and Roman chapters, but I loved how detailed and curious the general tone is. The way it is written, it almost feels as a dissertation on world history and I loved it from the first sentence to the last.

In the end, because I am such a slow reader, I wanted to start all over again. Jul 11, Shame Wolf rated it it was amazing. I'm not a history reader. So my judgment is not a refined one.

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But to me this provides a very good panoramic bird eye view of the general "big history" of humanity, of "big events" and largely influential civilizations and discoveries. I needed to understand how certain things connected to other parts and times of this big general history that I knew and was taught about.

This hasn't been a dissapointing book at all in delivering this which is what I think many will be looking for. I think Rober I'm not a history reader. I think Roberts is a man of kind of conservative views which you can see thinly revealed when reading between the lines at times. This may satisfy many or make you a little suspicious of the overall tone of the book. It depends, but to me it wasn't of extraordinary importance considering my objectives when reading this work.

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